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The Government of Canada implements its New Preclearance Act

Effective August 15, 2019, the Preclearance Act of 2016 gives enhanced powers to US Customs and Border Protection officers working in preclearance areas located in Canada, much to the chagrin of many concerned Canadians. The Act was implemented in furtherance of the Preclearance Agreement, a treaty signed by Canada and the US in 2015. Please click here to read the Dentons client alert.

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The Government of Canada implements its New Preclearance Act

Federal legalization of hemp in the United States and its effect on US immigration laws

US immigration laws eased after the US 2018 Farm Bill removes hemp (and extracts of hemp such as CBD), from the list of controlled substances that have immigration consequences. Signed into law by President Trump on December 20, 2019, removes a major roadblock that hindered foreign investment and job creation in the US lawful hemp industry. Please click here to read the full article.

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Federal legalization of hemp in the United States and its effect on US immigration laws

Cannabis in the United States and its implications in naturalization applications

In response to requests from state and local officials for clarification and adjustment of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services policies negatively impacting the legal immigration status of individuals who work or have worked in the legal cannabis industry, USCIS has updated its Policy Manual—but has not retreated from its position that cannabis-related activities will likely bar a lawful permanent resident of the US from naturalization, even if such activities take place in a state that has legalized cannabis. For a deep dive into the updated manual—including cannabis-related activities which, while not grounds for deportation may still be grounds for inadmissibility if the LPR travels abroad and attempts to re-enter the US—please click here.

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Cannabis in the United States and its implications in naturalization applications

Immigration consequences of Canadian criminal offences

Many Canadian criminal cases have potentially adverse consequences for immigration status. Accordingly, when a criminal lawyer in Canada represents a client who is not Canadian citizen, it is imperative that the lawyer consider the two distinct grounds of criminal inadmissibility described in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act 1 (IRPA)—A36(1), which addresses “serious criminality” and applies to both foreign nationals and permanent residents, and A36(2), which addresses “criminality” and applies only to foreign nationals. For a discussion by Dentons Toronto immigration partner Henry Chang on their respective implications, as well as the impacts of federal, provincial and juvenile offenses, as well as conditional sentences, please click here.

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Immigration consequences of Canadian criminal offences

How US federal cannabis legalization would affect US immigration law

During the 115th US Congress, several bills were introduced to legalize marijuana at the federal level. Those receiving the most attention were: (1) the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act (STATES Act); (2) Marijuana Justice Act of 2017/Marijuana Justice Act of 2018 (Marijuana Justice Act); and (3) the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act (Marijuana Freedom Act). While all three died when the Congress ended on January 3, 2019, they are likely to be reintroduced (without change) during the 116th Congress. For our analysis of how they might affect the ability of foreign nationals to enter the United States, click here.

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How US federal cannabis legalization would affect US immigration law

An overview of Canada’s Start-Up Business Class

Many foreign nationals are now aware that US immigration policies are more restrictive than in years past. For example, to protect the economic interests of US workers, President Trump issued an executive order directing government agencies to rigorously enforce and administer immigration laws. Meanwhile Canada remains relatively open to accepting new immigrants and, according to a report published by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, could accept as many as 1.1 million in total in the years 2019 through 2021. As a result, many foreign entrepreneurs who might otherwise have permanently settled in the US are instead considering Canada. Dentons partner, Henry Chang (who is based in our Toronto office) has provided a detailed discussion of Canada’s Start-Up Business Class, a permanent residence option for innovative foreign entrepreneurs. The full article appears here.

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An overview of Canada’s Start-Up Business Class