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Kazbek Sasiyev

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Russian citizens will now have to notify authorities when obtaining foreign citizenship or permanent residency in a foreign country

Russian Dual

On June 4, 2014 the President of the Russian Federation signed a law requiring Russian citizens to notify the migration authorities on obtaining foreign citizenship or any right to reside permanently in a foreign country within 60 calendar days of the occurrence of each event. Notification for Russian citizens who are under 18 years old should be submitted by their legal representatives (parents, guardians, etc.). The law will take effect starting from August 4, 2014.

The law will also apply to Russian citizens who have received foreign citizenship or a right to reside permanently in a foreign country before the effective date of the law. Such Russian citizens will also need to notify the migration authorities on obtaining foreign citizenship or any right to reside permanently in a foreign country within 60 calendar days upon the date of entry into force of the law (i.e., before October 3, 2014).

These new rules will not affect Russian citizens who permanently reside outside the Russian Federation (not simply those who have a right to reside permanently abroad, but who de facto stay permanently abroad). The question remains open however, as to whether a Russian citizen who currently resides permanently abroad and is therefore now exempt from notifying the migration authorities when entering and staying in Russia in the future can be held liable for failing to notify the migration authorities.

Notification of the migration authorities on obtaining foreign citizenship or any right to reside permanently in a foreign country may be given either personally or by sending a notification to the local migration office at the place of residence or stay of a Russian citizen through the Russian Post. The form of notification is currently being developed. In addition to the notification form, the applicant will also need to provide the migration authorities with an original (and copy) of his/her Russian passport and a copy of a document confirming his/her foreign citizenship or any right to reside permanently in a foreign country.

Failure to give the notification within the prescribed 60-day term, OR providing incomplete information, OR providing false information is subject to administrative liability and shall result in an administrative fine in the amount of 500 – 1,000 rubles (approx. 10 – 20 euros).

Failure to notify the migration authorities on obtaining foreign citizenship or any right to reside permanently in a foreign country is subject to criminal liability and shall result in a fine of up to 200,000 rubles (approx. 4,200 euros) OR up to the salary or other income of the convicted person for a period of up to one year OR compulsory community service of up to 400 hours.

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Russian citizens will now have to notify authorities when obtaining foreign citizenship or permanent residency in a foreign country

Potential new rules for Russian work or residency permits

Migrant Workers Learning

The Federation Council (the upper house of the Federal Assembly of Russia) approved on April 16 a law requiring foreign citizens to take examinations in Russian history, legislation and language in order to receive a certificate necessary for obtaining work permits and permanent or temporary residence permits. If the law is signed by Russian President Vladimir Putin, practically all categories of foreign employees (visa or non-visa) working in Russia – irrespective of whether they are migrants from the countries of the former Soviet Union working as street cleaners or skilled drilling engineers from elsewhere — will be required to comply as of January 1, 2015. The law will also apply to foreign workers employed as nannies, housekeepers, etc., and foreigners obtaining Russian permanent or temporary residence permits.

These new rules will not affect highly-qualified specialists (foreign employees earning more than approximately 40,000 euros a year who hold an applicable work permit) who work in Russia and foreign students of accredited state educational institutions who wish to work simultaneously with their studies.  In addition, applicants for a Russian permanent or temporary residence permit under 18 years old or over 65 (men) or 60 (women), as well as a few other categories of foreign citizens, will be exempt from such examinations.

Legislators believe the changes will be an important step towards the adaptation and integration of foreign citizens in Russia.

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Potential new rules for Russian work or residency permits