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Home Office publishes details of settlement scheme for EU citizens

 

 

 

 

 

EU citizens will be able to apply for settled status in three easy steps and for less than the price of a passport, under plans outlined by the Immigration Minister today. For more information, please contact your Dentons lawyer. For the full text see the Gov.UK website.

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Home Office publishes details of settlement scheme for EU citizens

Tier 2 Restricted Certificates of Sponsorship hit quota

Tier 2 Restricted Certificates of Sponsorship (CoS)—which employers use to employ non-EU/EEA nationals in the UK—are scarce.

All Tier 2 Restricted CoS applications that employers lodged before the April CoS allocation meeting on April 11, 2018, were successful, provided they scored 46 points or more. This meant that migrants had to be earning a minimum salary of £50,000. The pressure on the Tier 2 system is due to the drop in the number of EU/EEA migrants coming to the UK to work.

Only 1,975 Restricted CoS were available in the May allocation. Based on recent allocations, this will (again) not be sufficient to meet demand. In April, the Home Office granted 2,193 CoS. April was the fifth consecutive month that the allocation limit was exceeded. Employers across all industry sectors are urging the government to increase the cap amid a growing skills shortage.

Only prioritized applications, such as those on the shortage occupation list, PhD level occupations and where the salary is more than £50,000, will have a chance of success in May. Figures to be released at the end of the month will reveal the true picture.

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Tier 2 Restricted Certificates of Sponsorship hit quota

The travails of the ‘Windrush generation’ and the lessons for EU nationals

UK Minister of State for Immigration Caroline Nokes has set out the government’s commitment to support the “Windrush generation,” immigrants who migrated legally from British colonies or former colonies in the Caribbean between 1948 and 1973. The term “Windrush” derives from the name of the ship, the Empire Windrush, that brought the first arrivals in Britain’s post-war drive to fill a labor shortage. The ship carried 492 passengers, many of them children, from the Commonwealth country of Jamaica. Under the British Nationality Act, they and thousands who followed after, enjoyed British citizenship and full rights of entry and settlement. In 1962, however, British law changed to end the automatic right of entry and, throughout the 1960s and 1970s, as the Caribbean colonies gained independence—and their people different citizenship—a series of British laws further tightened immigration controls.

The story of Caribbean-born Britons took an inauspicious turn in 2012. Changes to immigration law that required documentation to work, rent a property or access benefits, including healthcare, left people fearful about their status. As it turned out, their fears were justified. Recent reports in the British press about longtime legal residents of West Indian and Caribbean ancestry losing their jobs, being denied medical care, being evicted, and even detained and threatened with deportation because they could not prove that they had lived in the country since before 1973 produced a public outcry and, on April 17, 2018, an apology from Prime Minister Theresa May.

The current “hostile environment”—aimed at making it difficult for illegal immigrants to settle in the UK—has meant that many people living in the UK legally are being asked to document their right to stay in the UK when trying to access healthcare, applying for a job, opening a bank account, or renting a property, and some of the Windrush generation who arrived here as children are finding it difficult to do so because they have never had a need to update their passports and immigration documents.

Their plight, however, is not dissimilar to that of EU nationals, who must also think about what documentation they can produce to prove their right to remain in the UK. There are thousands of EU nationals who do not hold passports and/or do not have a paper trail to evidence their nationality or time spent in the UK. Without such documents, they will find it difficult to meet the requirements to apply for residency documentation confirming their status. Such EU nationals will feel the same level of anxiety and experience the same hostile environment that the Windrush generation are contending with. However, for EU nationals there’s the added pressure of having to complete their application within six months of December 31, 2020, being the end of the implementation period. Those who fail to do so enter uncharted territory, as there is no information at present on what will happen to EU nationals who haven’t obtained new residency documents.

Guy Verhofstadt, the European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator, identified this very issue when speaking to The Telegraph for an article that appeared on April 18 on how the UK government’s handling of its Windrush citizens has led to fears that EU nationals could face similar problems. Verhofstadt said, “This could be worrying for millions of EU citizens in the UK who may fear that they could face similar treatment after Brexit.” He added that he expects that MEPs will be looking for safeguards for their constituents.

The UK government has accepted that the Windrush citizens are entitled to reside in the UK and to access public services, and has asserted its commitment to working with any individuals who do not have documentation to prove their right to be in the UK. A new dedicated Home Office team will help such individuals gather the evidence necessary to prove that they have been living or working in the UK, and when such evidence is gathered, will endeavor to resolve cases within two weeks and at no cost to the applicant. Unfortunately, however, while the Brexit talks have gone more smoothly as of late, there is not the same commitment between the UK government and EU governments to help EU nationals. Given the current climate of uncertainty, we are advising EU nationals and employers of EU nationals on their best course of action.

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The travails of the ‘Windrush generation’ and the lessons for EU nationals

Stretched resources: immigration and gender pay equity

Two stories in the UK headlines today relate to stretched resources: The Home Office preparing its immigration system for life after Brexit, and the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) enforcing employers to publish information on their gender pay gap.

Immigration system

According to the British House of Commons, it is unlikely the UK will have an immigration system in place when Britain leaves the EU in March 2019. The government has not published its future policy. This is causing distress for EU citizens living in Britain, and for UK businesses that rely on EU citizens.

An estimated three million EU citizens will need to register as having the right to be in the UK. Border force agencies will struggle to carry out checks on EU citizens arriving in the country. Agencies like Visas and Immigration, Immigration Enforcement and other departments of the Home Office will also feel the impact of the extra caseload. These services are already finding it difficult to cope, resulting in occasional poor decision-making. Dentons has worked with clients to help overcome these poor decisions.

The UK government is due to publish a white paper on immigration policy; already postponed from last autumn, it seems unlikely to see release before March 2019. Ministers working on the white paper have said the delay is to consider the Migration Advisory Committee’s report due in September 2018. Dentons contributed to this report, so we hope to see the collated views of our clients reflected in the future shape of UK immigration rules.

Gender pay equity

By April 4, 2018 companies with 250 or more employees are required to report the gender pay gap in their workforces. Questions have already been raised about whether the gender pay gap regulations under the Equality Act have teeth to motivate business to properly comply. On top of this, it seems likely the EHRC will struggle with having sufficient resources to enforce the regulations.

However, EHRC Chief Executive Rebecca Hilsenrath has distanced the commission from the responsibility of ensuring compliance. She has described the EHRC to the Financial Times as a “strategic enforcer” that looks at novel points of law”, and “at cases which will clarify the law”, and “where impact lies.” Therefore, the EHRC does not see itself as taking on all breaches of the Equality Act.

This bears out in the EHRC’s budget information: The government is not allocating additional resources for work on gender pay reporting. The EHRC will seek to increase its budget if many companies fail to comply with gender pay reporting. Having already seen its funding cut by 25 percent in the 2016–2020 spending review, a crystal ball is probably not needed to predict how any request for a budget increase will be answered.

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Stretched resources: immigration and gender pay equity

Cooking up a storm: Tier 2 chefs

 
 
 
  
 
 
       
 
 
 
 
 

UK immigration rules make a distinction between chefs working in takeaway establishments and those working in restaurants.

If the job requires five or more years of relevant experience in a role of at least equivalent status to the one in which the visa applicant is proposing to start, and the job is neither a fast food outlet, standard fare outlet or takeaway outlet, then the position will fall under the chef roles on the Tier 2 Shortage Occupation List.

This has recently been the subject of High Court cases in which chefs argued that it’s arbitrary and unreasonable to exclude from the Shortage Occupation List those working at restaurants that provide high-quality cuisine just because the establishment also, incidentally, happens to offer takeaway service. The chefs argued that all skilled chef roles should be on the Shortage Occupation List, and that the focus should be on the nature of the establishment rather than the fact that it incidentally provides takeaway food.

The Secretary of State argued otherwise and the court agreed, finding that the exclusion of jobs in takeaway, fast food and standard fare outlets from the Shortage Occupation List was justified. The court based its decision on evidence provided by the government that takeaway establishments were generally not associated with the kind of cuisine requiring highly skilled chefs.

In view of the rise in the number of gig economy delivery drivers delivering takeaway orders from fine-dining establishments, this is surely an issue that will rumble on.

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Cooking up a storm: Tier 2 chefs

UK government updates on Settled Status

The UK government has published further details on how the new settled status scheme for EU citizens and their family members will work as the UK leaves the EU. In the technical document sent to the European Commission, the government has pledged that this new system will be streamlined, low-cost and user-friendly, and will be designed with input from EU citizens.

EU citizens will have up to two years following the UK’s exit from the EU to apply to stay in the UK and obtain settled status. Applications will be decided based solely on the criteria set out in the Withdrawal Agreement and there will be no discretion for refusal based on other reasons. The criteria are not, as yet, conclusive. However, the government has confirmed that they will be simple, transparent and will minimize the need for documentary evidence. Unsuccessful applicants will have a statutory right of appeal in line with current rights provided by the Free Movement Directive.

There are also plans to set up a voluntary application process to provide those currently residing in the UK with the option to get new settled status at their earliest convenience—a recognition of the administrative challenge of granting status to potentially over three million EU citizens and their families.

Negotiations between the UK and EU are ongoing.

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UK government updates on Settled Status

Scotland: A separate system for global mobility?

The Times has revealed plans by Scottish ministers to pave the way for a bespoke immigration system.

Scottish ministers are concerned that Brexit will lead to a fall in immigrant workers, who are vital to the Scottish economy. Alasdair Allan, the Scottish government’s Europe minister, raised this as an issue to the Europe Committee earlier this year. “The Scottish government,” he said, “will continue to call for a less restrictive and more humane system from the UK which recognises individual and demographic circumstances.”

Scottish ministers plan to present to the UK government next summer an “options paper” that will set out some concessions from the UK immigration system. The most far-reaching of the requested options could be Scotland having its own, points-based immigration system with Holyrood in control. At the other end of the spectrum, the Scottish government may simply look to expand the Scotland Shortage Occupation List or reintroduce a post-study work route to give foreign graduates the chance to stay in Scotland to find work. The Shortage Occupation List contains occupations the country has trouble filling from inside Scotland. Concessions are made to the usual immigration process to bring in workers for these roles from outside the EU.

We will bring you more details as they are disclosed.

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Scotland: A separate system for global mobility?

Safeguarding the status of EU citizens: UK and EU negotiation update

 

 

 

 

 

 

The EU and UK have concluded their fifth round of negotiations.

Progress has been made on coming to an agreement in relation to the rights of EU citizens living in the UK. Some points are still to be negotiated.

The UK has confirmed that its “settled status” scheme, to be introduced next year, will be streamlined, digital and low-cost. For EU citizens who have permanent residence documents, the process of updating their status to “settled status” will be more straightforward. There may not be a cost, but if there is it will be greatly reduced.

The UK government has confirmed that safeguarding the status of EU citizens in the UK, and of UK nationals in the EU, will remain a priority. Prime Minister Theresa May said this week, “We want you [EU citizens] to stay.”

Keep your eye on The Global Mobility Review blog for further developments.

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Safeguarding the status of EU citizens: UK and EU negotiation update

MAC consultation on the future of the UK immigration system

As highlighted in our September Round-Up, we are participating in a call for evidence published by the UK’s Migration Advisory Committeee (MAC).

The UK government asked the MAC to advise it on the economic and social impacts of the UK’s exit from the European Union and also on how best to align the UK’s immigration system with a modern industrial strategy.

The MAC’s findings and recommendations will be based on the evidence it receives from interested parties. We will be your voice to the MAC. But to do so, we need your input and have developed a short survey to gather some general opinions.

Please find the survey here. It should not take you more than 5–10 minutes to complete the 13 questions. All responses will be anonymous and used to inform our response.

Please complete the survey by Wednesday, October 18, 2017.

Note: The acronym “EEA” refers to the European Economic Area, which includes all EU countries plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. The EU countries are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the UK.

If you have any queries, please contact your usual Dentons lawyer.

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MAC consultation on the future of the UK immigration system

Mind the gap

Employment law issues seem to be rife with gaps at the moment. We have already reported on the gender pay gap, brought to the fore by the UK’s new reporting regulations for gender pay that took effect on April 6, 2017. However, it looks like we are now dealing with another gap: the skills gap that commentators believe will be one of the consequences of the UK exiting the EU. In fact, we are already seeing the effects, as potential migrant workers are reluctant to come to the UK at a time of such uncertainty. As a result, there is a significant shortage of workers to fill such typical blue collar jobs as drivers, electrician assistants and construction workers. Sectors such as healthcare, retail and construction are among those feeling the squeeze, as they are heavily reliant on EU migrant workers. A study by the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) points out that EU migrants are over-represented in low-skilled jobs, filling 15 percent of them, compared with 7 percent by non-EU migrants and 78 per cent by Britons.

Furthermore, Brexit has led to curbed planned growth and investments for one in four small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), according to the latest “UK SME Confidence Index” from Vistage. And the shortage of workers has forced employers to raise starting salaries. According to the REC study, in August salaries increased at the fastest pace in nearly two years. This trend may not be sustainable over the long haul if it impacts too negatively on profitability and business sustainability.

In the meantime, automation and digitalization have been proposed as possible solutions to bridge the gap. However, whether replacement of people with machines is quite what voters intended back in June 2016 when the referendum took place is questionable at best.

 

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Mind the gap