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Canada streamlines work permit process for talented skilled foreign workers

Canadian immigration law allows Canadian employers to access foreign workers in certain situations where Canadian citizens and permanent residents are not available in the Canadian labor market. As a general policy, before Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) will issue a work permit to a foreign national, the foreign national’s prospective employer must obtain a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Service Canada/Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) confirming the need for a temporary worker and that no Canadians are available to do the job.

Obtaining an LMIA-based work permit can be an onerous process for an employer and one that can take up to five months or longer, unless the employer is able to benefit from variations to the general LMIA recruitment requirements, or falls under an expedited stream or one of the LMIA exemption codes. To avoid unnecessary delays and costs when recruiting foreign nationals for work in Canada, it is therefore important for employers to assess whether any variations, expedited streams or exemptions are available.

With a view to helping companies attract top global talent, scale up and remain competitive at the global level, the Government of Canada recently announced that, on June 12, 2017, it will http://cialisfrance24.com launch a new, 24-month pilot program, the Global Talent Stream (GTS). Eligible employers will benefit from quicker processing times for LMIAs and certain LMIA-based work permits. It is anticipated that ESDC will process these LMIA applications within 10 business days (rather than the current timing of up to several months), and after the LMIA application is approved by ESDC, IRCC will process the work permit application within 10 business days.

Two categories of employers will be eligible for the GTS. Category A covers high-growth companies with a demonstrated need for unique talent to scale-up and grow. Category B covers companies with a demonstrated need for highly-skilled foreign nationals for occupations found on a Skills Shortage List. The details of the GTS and the requirements to qualify as a Category A or B company are still being developed.

New information will be posted as it becomes available. Please contact us with any questions you may have regarding this new program.

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Canada streamlines work permit process for talented skilled foreign workers

Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Brand-36-Global-Employment-Blog-Banner
What Happens If You Really “Break A Leg!?”

According to the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, “Break a leg!” is something you say to wish someone good luck, especially before they perform in the theatre. Although there are many theories, the derivation of this term is unclear. The expression reflects a theatrical superstition that wishing a person “good luck” is actually considered bad luck. But is it really bad luck if you “break a leg?”

In this month’s edition, we feature articles from eight different countries Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Israel, UK and US. https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/achat-viagra-en-ligne-en-france/ As always, we thank you for you readership.

Read the complete issue

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Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Tax consequences for multinationals sending employees to Canada

US-and-Canada-flag-puzzle

Multinational corporations sending employees to foreign countries on business must be alert to the legal responsibilities that can arise from such transfers. Dentons partner Emmanuel Sala clarifies the Canadian and Quebec fiscal rules and mechanisms that govern US parent corporations with US employees employed in Canada. His article covers both Canadian federal and Quebec provincial payroll tax obligations. Regarding Canadian federal tax obligations, Emmanuel notes that if a US parent corporation is determined to have a “permanent establishment” (PE) in Canada, business profits attributable to the PE would be subject to Canadian federal income tax and various forms of tax relief would become unavailable. He provides an in-depth review of the most common situations that might give rise to a PE determination, including fixed-base, agency, construction-site and service. Emmanuel also discusses the possibility of implementing secondment arrangements to mitigate the risk of a PE determination.

Click to read article.

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Tax consequences for multinationals sending employees to Canada

US State Department changes E Visa processing in Canada for investors and traders

financial2

The US State Department announced, effective March 1, 2016, new streamlined registration and expanded processing locations for E-1 treaty trader and E-2 treaty investors visa applications processed in Canada.

Applications to register companies to qualify as E-1 and/or E-2 visa employers must be done at the US Consulate in Toronto. E-1 and E-2 visa applications for employees of companies not already registered, or of companies that have let their registration expire, must be submitted to the Toronto consulate.

E-1 and E-2 visa applications for employees of companies registered with the US Consulate in Toronto, as well as their dependent family members, may now apply at the US Embassy in Ottawa, as well as the US consulates in Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary and Montréal. Previously, only the Toronto and Vancouver consulates handled E visa applications.

Appointments are prioritized for Canadian citizens and permanent residents who are citizens of treaty countries. The US State Department publishes a complete list of treaty countries online, click to see a complete list. Limited appointments are available for citizens and residents of countries other than Canada.

E visa company registration indicates that a consular officer has determined that a company met E visa standards on a prior application. Registered companies are given a Notice of E Visa Company Registration. There are more streamlined E visa application procedures while the registration is valid, unless there are substantive changes to the enterprise that would jeopardize its E visa status. If there are substantial changes in the company’s ownership structure or operations since the registration notice was issued, the consular officer may require additional corporate documents to ensure the treaty enterprise still qualifies.

For more information about the E-1, E-2 and other US temporary and permanent visas, please see Dentons United States Immigration Guide.

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US State Department changes E Visa processing in Canada for investors and traders

Changes to Canadian Work Permit Categories for Television/Film and Performing Arts

Film photo

The Canadian Department of Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada (“IRCC”) has announced two new Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) exempt work permit categories for foreign nationals working in television and film or the performing arts.

Starting on February 17, 2016, the two new LMIA exemption categories will allow for certain foreign nationals to apply for a work permit without first having to apply to the Temporary Foreign Worker program for an LMIA. These work permit categories will now be governed under the International Mobility Program.

Television and Film (C14 Exemption – Significant Benefit)

Foreign nationals working in the TV and Film industry who hold positions that are essential to a TV or film production may be eligible to apply for a work permit directly at the port of entry (for TRV exempt nationals) or to a Canadian visa office abroad without first obtaining an LMIA. This new exemption will allow Canada to continue to attract high value TV and film productions to Canada, creating significant economic benefits and opportunities for Canadians. This exemption will apply to both Canadian productions and foreign productions.

To qualify, the positions must be considered to be “high wage” and are often unionized. In British Columbia a high wage position is considered to be an amount above $22.00 /hour and in Ontario, high wage is an amount over $21.15. See all provincial wage thresholds at: http://www.esdc.gc.ca/en/foreign_workers/hire/median_wage/index.page

Employers will be required to file an “Offer of Employment for LMIA Exempt Work Permits” with IRCC and pay a compliance fee of $230 before the work permit application is made. The Offer of Employment must be filed in advance and proof of filing will be required for the foreign national to make their work permit application.

To support the work permit application, the production must provide a support letter outlining some general information in relation to the production, a statement that the foreign worker and the position to be held by the foreign worker is essential to the production, and details on the economic benefit of the production to Canada (including the number of Canadians created by the production, the estimate budget to be spent in Canada and a statement confirming that the production satisfies the criteria for federal or provincial tax credits or is the recipient of federal or provincial funding). The production must also provide a letter of support from the applicable union.

For further details, please see: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/temp/work/opinion/imp-c14.asp

Performing Arts (C23 – Reciprocal Employment)

Foreign nationals working as key creative personnel and talent associated with non-profit performing arts organizations involved in theater, opera, orchestras, and dance may be eligible for this LMIA exempt work permit. This new exemption will allow for foreign nationals to apply for work permits in the performing arts if they can demonstrate reciprocal opportunities for Canadians outside of Canada in the same discipline. A one to one ratio of reciprocity does not have to be proven, rather a general statement affirming that reciprocity has been known to exist with an explanation of how the organization plans to allow for opportunities for Canadians outside of Canada.

Employers will be required to file an “Offer of Employment for LMIA Exempt Work Permits” with IRCC and pay a compliance fee of $230 before the work permit application is made. The Offer of Employment must be filed in advance and proof of filing will be required for the foreign national to make their work permit application.

To support the work permit application, the performing arts organization will be required to provide a support letter outlining the reciprocity for Canadians abroad in the specific discipline, a copy of the job offer to the foreign national, and confirmation of the organization’s funding support from the Canadian government or applicable parliamentary council for the arts.

For further details on the performing arts LMIA exemption and reciprocity letters, please see: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/temp/work/opinion/imp-c23.asp

Foreign Funded Commercials Filmed in Canada – Business Visitor

Another change that IRCC announced this week applies to essential personnel (including producers, directors, actors, technicians, etc.) entering Canada to shoot a foreign funded commercial or advertisement in Canada. This exemption falls under the Business Visitor category and therefore does not require an application for a work permit. The entry as a Business Visitor for filming commercials (or print advertising) is limited for entry to Canada for a very short duration (under 2 weeks).

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Changes to Canadian Work Permit Categories for Television/Film and Performing Arts

Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 1 – November/December 2015

Global Employment Lawyer - Nov. & Dec. 2015

 

Look out, beware—it’s holiday party season!

For many companies, having an annual holiday party is part of the culture and tradition of the organization. Company holiday parties provide employees with an opportunity to socialize and celebrate together, and can certainly help boost morale and engender loyalty. At the same time, however, there are risks lurking. Depending on the type of party and the part of the world you are having it in, there are different types of risks that can come into play—and we have some tips to mitigate them.

What’s not risky? Keeping up to date on the hot topics in employment and labor issues from around the globe which could affect your business goals in those regions.

From all of your friends at Dentons, we wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous holiday season!

Read the complete issue

 

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Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 1 – November/December 2015

New Entrepreneur Immigration Program opens in British Columbia, Canada

opendooroptions

British Columbia’s Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP) reopened its doors for business immigrants to Canada on July 2, 2015. In a landscape of unfriendly federal business immigration programs and preference for employer-driven individual immigration programs, the new BC PNP Entrepreneur Immigration program is extremely attractive for prospective business immigrants to Canada.

The appeal

  • No minimum English language skills required
  • No age restriction
  • Minimum of 33 percent business ownership only
  • Low thresholds for minimum net worth (CA$600,000) and investment (CA$200,000)
  • Low initial registration fee of CA$300

Looking closer

It may sound too good to be true, because it probably is. BC PNP is attracting as many applications as it can so it can choose the best. In fact, BC PNP will now have a Pool of applicants competing to get as many points (maximum 200) as possible—however, only 200 applicants are accepted into the Pool each month. BC PNP will then make periodic draws from the Pool to award applicants holding the highest scores with an Invitation to Apply for the Entrepreneur Immigration program. So while the bar seems to be set low, applicants will need a competitive score to be successful.

A competitive score can come from increasing individual points as much as possible for each category:

Points category Points
Experience 24
Net Worth 12
Personal Investment 30
Jobs 36
Adaptability 18
Business Concept 80
Total 200

 

This could mean having greater management experience, higher net worth, significant investments, English language skills or even choosing a better business. For instance, an eligible business for the Business Concept must, at minimum, contribute to the province’s economic growth. However, there is also a list of business types that offer significant economic benefits and those would presumably be more valuable on the points system.

Other requirements for the program, like its predecessor, include:

  • Business or management experience;
  • Active management of a new or improved existing business located in British Columbia;
  • Intention to reside in British Columbia; and
  • Introduction of at least one full-time job for a Canadian or permanent resident.

Undoubtedly, the BC PNP Entrepreneur Immigration program will reopen doors of opportunity for prospective business immigrants to Canada.

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New Entrepreneur Immigration Program opens in British Columbia, Canada

Global Employment Lawyer – Issue 3

Summer 2015

Global Employment Lawyer

The third edition of the Global Employment Lawyer provides you with practical content to keep you current on developments that effect your business goals around the globe. Our lawyers look at questions of religious accommodation as well as the unpleasant income tax consequences of temporary visas in the US; managing “difficult employees” in Canada; reducing workforce due to redundancies in China; imminent changes to Polish labor law; recruitment of non-resident foreign workers in Angola; employing foreign workers in Israel and whistleblowing in the UK.

Read more

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Global Employment Lawyer – Issue 3

LMIA Exempt Work Permit Applications – New Procedure

Effective February 21, 2015, there will be changes to the work permit application process for categories that are currently exempt from obtaining a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) and employer specific. The changes follow amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations focused on employer compliance in the employment of foreign workers.

As a result of the regulatory amendments, most work permit applications will now require a 2 step process:

Step 1. Either an LMIA application to Service Canada OR a new procedure involving an application form to be submitted to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) for LMIA exempt categories (Form IMM 5802 – Offer of Employment to a Labour Market Impact Assessment Exempt Foreign National) with an additional $230 employer compliance fee.

Step 2. Work permit application.

This new procedure is applicable to all LMIA exempt work permits that are employer specific including work permit extension applications, visa office applications, port of entry applications. The new procedure will apply to most LMIA exempt work permit applications including work permits under NAFTA, intra-company transfers, PNPs, signficant benefit, etc. (Note: step 1 is not required for open work permit applicants, however, open work permits will be subject to an additional $100 privilege fee).

The new IMM 5802 Form and online fee payment (through their current CIC online fee payment site) will be available on Wednesday, February 18, 2015. The new form will require general corporate information about the employer (including contact information), the terms of the offer, information supporting the LMIA exemption and an attestation by the employer on the terms of the offer of employment.

Third party representatives will be able to submit the IMM 5802 Form for employers as long as the employer contact has signed a Use of Rep form (IMM 5476). The process requires that the IMM 5802 be completed by employers and submitted with the $230 payment to CIC.

Once the IMM 5802 Form is submitted to CIC, a confirmation will be generated by CIC. This confirmation along with a copy of the IMM 5802 Form and the $230 fee payment must be provided to the foreign worker to make an application for a work permit (i.e. at the visa office, online or at POE etc.)

There is not an advance “adjudication process” for the IMM 5802 Form before the work permit application is processed. For example, although proof that the IMM 5802 Form was submitted is required for an applicant to apply for a work permit at the POE, it was indicated that this could be done 5 minutes prior to arriving at the port of entry, as long as the applicant had a copy of the submitted IMM 5802 Form and payment confirmation with their work permit application.

There will also be a process for receiving a refund of the $230 employer compliance fee (and $100 privilege fee) if a work permit application is refused

More information will be posted by CIC this week and the link to the CIC site can be found at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/temp/work/admissibility/specific.asp

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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LMIA Exempt Work Permit Applications – New Procedure

New year, new employment issues

Global_Employment_Lawyer_Winter_2015

The mission of Dentons’ Global Employment Lawyer is to keep you informed of significant trends and developments in the area of global employment and labor law, wherever they take place, so that you are in a better position to make educated business decisions. Thank you for helping to make the first edition of the Global Employment Lawyer a huge success!

In this second edition of the Dentons’ Global Employment Lawyer, our lawyers examine:

  • Options for dealing with employee layoffs in China for foreign investors
  • Canada’s recent decision to require employee accommodation for childcare responsibilities
  • Restrictions under Polish law which can affect employment settlements
  • Romania’s recent decisions effecting union standing and disciplinary actions against employees
  • Specific ambiguities in Egyptian labor law on financial entitlements, employment terminations and collective dispute resolution mechanisms
  • UK’s recent employment decision potentially increasing the amount of holiday pay owed to certain overtime workers
  • Current and pending changes to US employment regulations for 2015, including laws affecting paid sick leave, anti discrimination and bullying, social media, severance and more
  • US IRS regulation Section 457A’s effect on deferred compensation for US taxpayers who work for non-US entities
  • Recap of Dentons’ client seminar on critical employment issues for multinationals

Read the complete issue

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New year, new employment issues