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Federal legalization of hemp in the United States and its effect on US immigration laws

US immigration laws eased after the US 2018 Farm Bill removes hemp (and extracts of hemp such as CBD), from the list of controlled substances that have immigration consequences. Signed into law by President Trump on December 20, 2019, removes a major roadblock that hindered foreign investment and job creation in the US lawful hemp industry. Please click here to read the full article.

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Federal legalization of hemp in the United States and its effect on US immigration laws

Immigration consequences of Canadian criminal offences

Many Canadian criminal cases have potentially adverse consequences for immigration status. Accordingly, when a criminal lawyer in Canada represents a client who is not Canadian citizen, it is imperative that the lawyer consider the two distinct grounds of criminal inadmissibility described in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act 1 (IRPA)—A36(1), which addresses “serious criminality” and applies to both foreign nationals and permanent residents, and A36(2), which addresses “criminality” and applies only to foreign nationals. For a discussion by Dentons Toronto immigration partner Henry Chang on their respective implications, as well as the impacts of federal, provincial and juvenile offenses, as well as conditional sentences, please click here.

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Immigration consequences of Canadian criminal offences

Proposed change to afford certain temporary foreign workers with increased mobility

A proposed amendment to Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR) would provide increased employment mobility to certain foreign workers under the Canadian Temporary Foreign Worker Program. It still remains to be seen whether Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada will move forward with the amendment, and whether there is any appetite to provide similar changes to programs used to employ more highly-skilled foreign workers. To view the article on this proposed amendment, written by a member of our Toronto Employment and Labor team, click here.

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Proposed change to afford certain temporary foreign workers with increased mobility

New Zealand citizens may now pursue E1/E2 visas


Citizens of New Zealand and the United States making a business investment in the other country or engaging in trade between the two countries are now eligible for new immigration benefits. On June 10, 2019, US consular officials in New Zealand began processing E-1 treaty trader and E-2 treaty investor visa applications filed by New Zealand citizens. 

These visas are allowed under the Knowledgeable Innovators and Worthy Investors (KIWI) Act, which was signed into law by President Trump in August 2018.

To qualify for E-1 classification, the applicant must:

  • Be a citizen of New Zealand and the US business must be at least 50 percent owned by citizens of New Zealand;
  • Carry on “substantial trade,” as measured by a history of continuous flow of sizable international trade items involving numerous transactions over time;
  • Carry on “principal trade,” meaning at least 50 percent of the business’s international trade is between the US and New Zealand; and
  • Develop and direct the enterprise through either (i) at least 50 percent ownership of the enterprise or (ii) employment in a supervisory capacity or where the applicant brings essential skills. 

To qualify for E-2 classification, the applicant must:

  • Be a citizen of New Zealand and the US business must be at least 50 percent owned by citizens of New Zealand;
  • Invest substantial capital in an active, commercial enterprise in the US at a level that is above that which could merely support the applicant and his or her accompanying family members; and
  • Develop and direct the enterprise through either (i) at least 50 percent ownership of the enterprise or (ii) employment in a supervisory capacity or where the applicant brings essential skills. 

Successful applicants will be issued a multiple-entry visa, valid for up to five years and be allowed an initial stay of up to two years, with extensions available. There is no limit on the total time spent on E-visa status, but E- visa holders must be able to prove their intention to depart the US at the end of their authorized stay, whether through status expiration or termination. The applicant’s spouse and unmarried children under 21 are eligible for the same visa and period of stay. The spouse also may apply for an employment authorization document and family members may attend school.

Although the KIWI Act is not a bilateral treaty extending equivalent benefits to US citizens. For Americans interested in New Zealand, it should be noted that New Zealand already has an immigrant investor visa, an entrepreneur visa and a global impact visa that collectively offer broader benefits to citizens of the US and other countries than the KIWI Act provides New Zealanders.

The visa benefits for citizens of New Zealand and the US are a welcome addition that will benefit both countries. Please contact Dentons for more information.

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New Zealand citizens may now pursue E1/E2 visas

New regulations set out work and residence permit procedure for UK nationals living in Spain post-Brexit

This article was originally published on Dentons’ UK Employment Hub blog.

New regulations have been enacted in Spain setting out what UK citizens working or living in Spain after Brexit will be required to do to maintain their right to live and work there.

The regulations apply to UK and Northern Irish citizens living in Spain before the exit date. Affected individuals must apply for a special work and residence permit within 21 months of Brexit. During this 21 month “transition period”, UK nationals will broadly maintain the same rights they currently have under EU law (except, for example, the right to vote and stand in elections to the European Parliament).

Dentons’ lawyers in Spain have put together a summary of the key points of the regulations, which can be found here.

As the largest law firm in the world Dentons is uniquely placed to provide high-quality counsel to clients both within and outside Europe. Our experts have put together a number of resources, including a series of webinars and a Brexit jargon buster, which can be found here. Dentons’ lawyers in Spain have put together a summary of the key points of the regulations, which can be found here.

As the countdown to exit day continues, please contact Jessica Pattinson (Head of Immigration, UK) at jessica.pattinson@dentons.com if you require any additional support on immigration matters.

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New regulations set out work and residence permit procedure for UK nationals living in Spain post-Brexit

Measures to ensure compliance with the rules of stay in Russia

Russian Passport

We draw your attention to the entry into force on January 16, 2019, of Federal Law No. 216-FZ of July 19, 2018 on Amendments to Article 16 of the Federal Law on the Legal Status of Foreign Citizens in the Russian Federation. This law considerably changes the area of migration relations that had been considered the least formalized. It involves measures for the foreign citizen to comply with the rules of stay in Russia (such as leaving Russia on time at the end of the period of stay and complying with the stated purpose of the visit), the liability for violation of which was previously imposed on the foreign citizen.

The new rules set forth that the inviting party (i.e., the organization or individual who invited the foreign citizen to Russia) is responsible for taking measures to ensure the foreign citizen complies with the rules of stay in Russia. The list of required measures and how they are applied is to be further determined by the RF Government. The RF Government resolution setting forth these measures has yet to be published; however, the draft resolution can be viewed here. According to the draft, it is assumed that the inviting party will have to take the following set of measures:

  1. Serve the foreign citizen a notice again signature that the foreign citizen needs to comply with the purpose of entry and warning the foreign citizen of liability for failure to comply, as soon he/she enters the country. The form of the notice is approved by the Ministry of the Interior of Russia.
  2. Provide the foreign citizen with the conditions he/she needs to comply with the stated purpose of entry (e.g., employing a foreigner who entered the country on a work visa, or arranging business negotiations for a foreigner who entered the country on a business visa).
  3. Stay in contact and correspond with the foreigner.
  4. Inform the Ministry of the Interior of Russia if it is discovered that the foreign citizen has not left Russia at the set time or if the foreign citizen fails to comply with the rules of stay, and also if contact is lost with the foreign citizen. The form(s) for doing this is/are approved by the Ministry of the Interior of Russia.
  5. Remind the foreign citizen in advance (at least 10 days before the visa expires) of the need to leave Russia. The reminder: (i) is sent to the foreign citizen by registered letter with notification or by email with confirmation that it has been read, or (ii) is personally delivered to the foreign citizen against signature.
  6. Assist the foreign citizen in overcoming various circumstances preventing him/her from leaving the Russian Federation on time (e.g., not having money to leave, loss of documents).

As stated above, this draft RF Government resolution with list of measures to ensure an invited foreign citizen follows the rules of stay in Russia has not yet been published. It is anticipated that the RF Government will publish the resolution in the near future. We will provide information about this on our website.

The Code of Administrative Offenses (Article 18.9(2) of the Code of Administrative Offenses) establishes the inviting party’s liability for failing to take the above-mentioned measures. This liability is in the form of administrative fines on the officer and on the organization of up to RUB 50,000 (on the officer) and up to RUB 500,000 (on the organization).

Considering the above, at this stage we recommend taking action to make a list of all foreign citizens your company has invited and who hold currently valid visas (whether work, business or guest visas). This will make it possible to then take all of the measures listed above to ensure they comply with the rules of stay in Russia.

Click here to read Dentons article.

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Measures to ensure compliance with the rules of stay in Russia

Home Office publishes details of settlement scheme for EU citizens

EU citizens will be able to apply for settled status in three easy steps and for less than the price of a passport, under plans outlined by the Immigration Minister today. For more information, please contact your Dentons lawyer. For the full text see the Gov.UK website.

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Home Office publishes details of settlement scheme for EU citizens

The travails of the ‘Windrush generation’ and the lessons for EU nationals

UK Minister of State for Immigration Caroline Nokes has set out the government’s commitment to support the “Windrush generation,” immigrants who migrated legally from British colonies or former colonies in the Caribbean between 1948 and 1973. The term “Windrush” derives from the name of the ship, the Empire Windrush, that brought the first arrivals in Britain’s post-war drive to fill a labor shortage. The ship carried 492 passengers, many of them children, from the Commonwealth country of Jamaica. Under the British Nationality Act, they and thousands who followed after, enjoyed British citizenship and full rights of entry and settlement. In 1962, however, British law changed to end the automatic right of entry and, throughout the 1960s and 1970s, as the Caribbean colonies gained independence—and their people different citizenship—a series of British laws further tightened immigration controls.

The story of Caribbean-born Britons took an inauspicious turn in 2012. Changes to immigration law that required documentation to work, rent a property or access benefits, including healthcare, left people fearful about their status. As it turned out, their fears were justified. Recent reports in the British press about longtime legal residents of West Indian and Caribbean ancestry losing their jobs, being denied medical care, being evicted, and even detained and threatened with deportation because they could not prove that they had lived in the country since before 1973 produced a public outcry and, on April 17, 2018, an apology from Prime Minister Theresa May.

The current “hostile environment”—aimed at making it difficult for illegal immigrants to settle in the UK—has meant that many people living in the UK legally are being asked to document their right to stay in the UK when trying to access healthcare, applying for a job, opening a bank account, or renting a property, and some of the Windrush generation who arrived here as children are finding it difficult to do so because they have never had a need to update their passports and immigration documents.

Their plight, however, is not dissimilar to that of EU nationals, who must also think about what documentation they can produce to prove their right to remain in the UK. There are thousands of EU nationals who do not hold passports and/or do not have a paper trail to evidence their nationality or time spent in the UK. Without such documents, they will find it difficult to meet the requirements to apply for residency documentation confirming their status. Such EU nationals will feel the same level of anxiety and experience the same hostile environment that the Windrush generation are contending with. However, for EU nationals there’s the added pressure of having to complete their application within six months of December 31, 2020, being the end of the implementation period. Those who fail to do so enter uncharted territory, as there is no information at present on what will happen to EU nationals who haven’t obtained new residency documents.

Guy Verhofstadt, the European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator, identified this very issue when speaking to The Telegraph for an article that appeared on April 18 on how the UK government’s handling of its Windrush citizens has led to fears that EU nationals could face similar problems. Verhofstadt said, “This could be worrying for millions of EU citizens in the UK who may fear that they could face similar treatment after Brexit.” He added that he expects that MEPs will be looking for safeguards for their constituents.

The UK government has accepted that the Windrush citizens are entitled to reside in the UK and to access public services, and has asserted its commitment to working with any individuals who do not have documentation to prove their right to be in the UK. A new dedicated Home Office team will help such individuals gather the evidence necessary to prove that they have been living or working in the UK, and when such evidence is gathered, will endeavor to resolve cases within two weeks and at no cost to the applicant. Unfortunately, however, while the Brexit talks have gone more smoothly as of late, there is not the same commitment between the UK government and EU governments to help EU nationals. Given the current climate of uncertainty, we are advising EU nationals and employers of EU nationals on their best course of action.

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The travails of the ‘Windrush generation’ and the lessons for EU nationals

Brexit latest: EU nationals who arrive during the post-Brexit transition period can stay

On February 28, the UK government announced that EU nationals who arrive in the UK after Brexit Day (scheduled for March 29, 2019), but before the end of the so-called “implementation” or “transition” period, will be able to stay permanently. This is a shift from the UK’s previous position that arrivals after Brexit Day would be entitled to remain on a temporary basis only and would become subject to immigration controls at the end of the transition period. While this announcement brings the UK closer to the EU’s stance on this matter, there are still some fundamental differences to be negotiated.

Overall this is positive news for employers, especially those who rely on EU talent, who will now have a longer period to build new talent pipelines to replace workers from the EU.

However, this concession may have come too late for some employers who have already lost valuable talent due to a general feeling of uncertainty among EU nationals and negativity around citizens’ rights. It remains to be seen whether this latest shift in negotiating position will be enough to convince EU nationals that the UK remains an attractive destination to work and build a career.

The UK’s original position was partly based on an assumption that EU nationals would rush to move to the UK before a given cut-off date. The dramatic fall in net migration from the EU since the referendum shows that there was never a risk of this happening.

EU nationals who arrive in the UK during the transition period will be subject to a registration system in line with what is already common practice in other EU member states. After accumulating five years’ residence in the UK an EU national will be able to apply for indefinite leave to remain (ILR), which will allow them to live in the UK permanently.

It should be noted that ILR is not the same as “settled status,” which EU nationals who arrive before Brexit Day will be able to apply for. The application process for ILR usually requires the applicant to satisfy minimum salary requirements, demonstrate English language ability and pass the “life in the UK” test. ILR is also more restrictive than settled status; for example, the holder of ILR will lose this status if they are absent from the UK for a period of two years, while for the holder of settled status, absence up to five years is permitted. It remains to be seen what the qualifying criteria for ILR in this situation will be, and whether a special procedure will be established that is more closely aligned to settled status.

Looking to the future, employers should also be encouraged by the following section of the announcement, which relates to a new immigration framework to be implemented post Brexit:

“… leaving the EU does not mean the end of migration between the EU and the UK. The new framework will therefore be designed to support the UK economy, enable businesses and key public sector workforces such as the National Health Service to access the skills they need, and underpin our trading relationships with partners in Europe and around the world.”

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Brexit latest: EU nationals who arrive during the post-Brexit transition period can stay

Brexodus continues

Net migration from the EU has plummeted from 165,000 in 2016 to 90,000 in 2017.

As expected, in the latest statistics released by the Office of National Statistics today, net migration from the EU has plummeted, with fewer EU nationals moving to the UK and more leaving:

2016 2017
EU nationals who immigrated to the UK 268,000 220,000
EU nationals who emigrated from the UK 103,000 130,000
Net migration +165,000 +90,000

This is of significant concern to industries and sectors that rely heavily on EU talent, with health and medical services, and farming and agriculture already dealing with considerable labour shortages.

The UK will officially leave the EU on March 29, 2019, and even though this is still over 12 months away, employers are already feeling the impact.

The other interesting statistic released today is the huge increase in EU nationals applying for British citizenship. In 2016 15,460 EU nationals applied for British citizenship—following the Brexit referendum this number more than doubled to 38,528 in 2017.

What we can take from both of these statistics is that the lack of certainty in citizens’ rights and future immigration policy following Brexit is forcing individuals to consider and protect their position in the UK. At one end of the spectrum we can see that EU nationals are securing their rights in the UK by naturalising as a British citizen, and at the other end EU nationals are reassessing whether the UK is the place to establish a life and career in the first place. Without certainty on citizens’ rights and future immigration policy we can expect these statistics to continue on the same trajectory.

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Brexodus continues