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The Trump wild card: what employers can expect from the new administration

Thursday, January 26, 2017
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
Webinar

With Donald Trump’s election as the 45th president of the United States, and the Republican Party retaining control of both the Senate and House of Representatives, employers can expect some changes.

Join us for an engaging discussion on the Trump administration’s workplace policy priorities, their likely impacts on employers, and what you can do now to prepare for the changes to come. Among the topics to be covered are: the effect on the labor pool of proposed changes in immigration policy; the impact of Obamacare “repeal and replace” on employer-sponsored health plans; compensation issues; the future of regulations covering whistleblowing and human rights protections; the Trump NLRB; the DOL’s Fiduciary Rule; and workplace discrimination. Dentons partner Cynthia Jackson will lead a panel of Dentons lawyers as they tackle these questions and more.

Meeting agenda

Immigration outlook: labor force issues

Campaign promises to increase worksite visa audits and investigations, build a wall along the Mexico border, establish a deportation force, and place new restrictions on immigration from some majority-Muslim countries may become law. The new Administration is likely to adopt policies even before Congress acts. How will these developments impact employers who rely on business visas to hire the best and brightest from around the world? We will predict the future and provide guidance on how employers can prepare now.

The repeal of the ACA and other developments post-ObamaCare

The election of Donald Trump to the presidency, together with Republicans maintaining control of Congress has, for the first time since the Affordable Care Act’s enactment, put the law’s future in serious question. With the new Administration taking the reins of government on January 20, we will discuss the distinct possibility of the ACA’s repeal and replacement, including options for the White House and the expected congressional timeline for debating and passing legislative changes.

Compensation and other DOL regulations

The Department of Labor raced to the end of the Obama administration with a wave of regulatory activity applying to the public sector and government contractors relating to overtime, blacklists, pay equality and sick leave. Courts stalled implementation of some of the more controversial regulations. How will the new administration act in its initial days regarding the recent flurry of regulations?

Whistleblower and human rights developments

During the campaign, President-elect Trump stated that he would dismantle Dodd-Frank, repeal President Obama’s executive orders and unburden companies of excessive regulation. We will address how that will impact whistleblower and bounty hunter programs at the SEC and elsewhere, as well as laws impacting eradication of human trafficking and slavery.

The DOL’s fiduciary rule and the evolution of the NLRB under Trump

The Trump NLRB is expected to reverse recent Board decisions relating to concerted activity, joint employment, election processes and other issues favoring labor. But when will the reversals begin? This presentation will address both NLRB issues and processes during the first year of a Trump presidency. In addition, we will briefly discuss the status and likely future of the DOL’s fiduciary rule.

Workplace discrimination

The Obama administration broadly interpreted Title VII to include anti-discrimination protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. We will look at whether that trend will continue under Trump. Other current trends in anti-discrimination enforcement and litigation will also be discussed, with a focus on statements made by the President-elect and his team during the campaign and the transition.

Register Now

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The Trump wild card: what employers can expect from the new administration

UK Employment Law Round Up, Volume 1, Issue 10 – 2016


UK Employment Law Round-up

In this issue we look at recent case law decisions which have provided a useful reminder of the position when dealing with contracts tainted by illegality and taking prior disciplinary warnings into account. We also bring you up to date with the latest thoughts on calculating holiday pay, and the scope of ACAS Early Conciliation certificates. We review the new judicial assessment procedure in the employment tribunal, along with proposals to inspect corporate governance and to ask employers to disclose employed foreign nationals.

Read the full newsletter here.

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UK Employment Law Round Up, Volume 1, Issue 10 – 2016

Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Brand-36-Global-Employment-Blog-Banner
What Happens If You Really “Break A Leg!?”

According to the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, “Break a leg!” is something you say to wish someone good luck, especially before they perform in the theatre. Although there are many theories, the derivation of this term is unclear. The expression reflects a theatrical superstition that wishing a person “good luck” is actually considered bad luck. But is it really bad luck if you “break a leg?”

In this month’s edition, we feature articles from eight different countries Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Israel, UK and US. As always, we thank you for you readership.

Read the complete issue

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Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Department of Labor’s new fiduciary conflict of interest proposal remains controversial

Pensions-(ThinkStock)

Last Tuesday, the US Department of Labor (DOL) released its 120-page notice of proposed rulemaking to revamp the Employee Retirement Income Security Act’s (ERISA) fiduciary conflict of interest rules, along with 246 pages of proposed prohibited transaction exemptions and amendments to existing exemptions. Even before their issuance, the proposed rules drew harsh criticism from the investment community, which recognized that the proposed rules would turn many financial professionals into ERISA fiduciaries and change how they could be compensated and the way they do business.

Given the vocal opposition to the new rules, the ultimate scope and fate of their specific provisions is yet to be determined. But the ongoing debate over how investment advisers should operate in the face of potential conflicts of interest is unlikely to leave the current status quo in place. At stake is not just what standards will apply to the investment advisory community, but who within the federal government will establish those standards.

Dentons’ Pensions, Benefits and Executive Compensation team explores the proposed rules.

Read the complete article

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Department of Labor’s new fiduciary conflict of interest proposal remains controversial

Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Labour-2-(ThinkStock)

December 10, 2014 04:00 PM – 07:00 PM EDT    

McGraw-Hill Conference Space    

1221 Avenue of the Americas 50th Floor

New York, NY United States

Dentons Global Employment and Labor group is pleased to invite you to an interactive program bringing together Dentons lawyers from around the globe to present on several critical employment issues facing multi-national employers. The three-panel program will be followed by networking cocktails where you will have an opportunity to mingle and connect with professionals in the industry.

Panel topics and speakers:

Moderated by Brian Cousin

Privacy Panel (4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.): Andy Roth (US), Barbara Johnston (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video), Neil Capobianco (US)

Global Mobility Panel (5:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.): Matt Schulz (US), Michael Bronstein (UK), Todd Liao (China by video)

Restrictive Covenants Panel (6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.): Richard Scharlat (US), Adrian Miedema (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video)

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Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Global Mobility Effectiveness Survey

Ernst & Young released their 2013 report on the increasingly critical role of global mobility functions at multinational firms.  The report discusses the importance of compliance control to manage risks related to payroll tax and social security compliance, with 64% of companies reporting they incurred avoidable penalties for noncompliance and only 30% reporting they have a system in place to track business travelers.

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Global Mobility Effectiveness Survey