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The Trump wild card: what employers can expect from the new administration

Thursday, January 26, 2017
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
Webinar

With Donald Trump’s election as the 45th president of the United States, and the Republican Party retaining control of both the Senate and House of Representatives, employers can expect some changes.

Join us for an engaging discussion on the Trump administration’s workplace policy priorities, their likely impacts on employers, and what you can do now to prepare for the changes to come. Among the topics to be covered are: the effect on the labor pool of proposed changes in immigration policy; the impact of Obamacare “repeal and replace” on employer-sponsored health plans; compensation issues; the future of regulations covering whistleblowing and human rights protections; the Trump NLRB; the DOL’s Fiduciary Rule; and workplace discrimination. Dentons partner Cynthia Jackson will lead a panel of Dentons lawyers as they tackle these questions and more.

Meeting agenda

Immigration outlook: labor force issues

Campaign promises to increase worksite visa audits and investigations, build a wall along the Mexico border, establish a deportation force, and place new restrictions on immigration from some majority-Muslim countries may become law. The new Administration is likely to adopt policies even before Congress acts. How will these developments impact employers who rely on business visas to hire the best and brightest from around the world? We will predict the future and provide guidance on how employers can prepare now.

The repeal of the ACA and other developments post-ObamaCare

The election of Donald Trump to the presidency, together with Republicans maintaining control of Congress has, for the first time since the Affordable Care Act’s enactment, put the law’s future in serious question. With the new Administration taking the reins of government on January 20, we will discuss the distinct possibility of the ACA’s repeal and replacement, including options for the White House and the expected congressional timeline for debating and passing legislative changes.

Compensation and other DOL regulations

The Department of Labor raced to the end of the Obama administration with a wave of regulatory activity applying to the public sector and government contractors relating to overtime, blacklists, pay equality and sick leave. Courts stalled implementation of some of the more controversial regulations. How will the new administration act in its initial days regarding the recent flurry of regulations?

Whistleblower and human rights developments

During the campaign, President-elect Trump stated that he would dismantle Dodd-Frank, repeal President Obama’s executive orders and unburden companies of excessive regulation. We will address how that will impact whistleblower and bounty hunter programs at the SEC and elsewhere, as well as laws impacting eradication of human trafficking and slavery.

The DOL’s fiduciary rule and the evolution of the NLRB under Trump

The Trump NLRB is expected to reverse recent Board decisions relating to concerted activity, joint employment, election processes and other issues favoring labor. But when will the reversals begin? This presentation will address both NLRB issues and processes during the first year of a Trump presidency. In addition, we will briefly discuss the status and likely future of the DOL’s fiduciary rule.

Workplace discrimination

The Obama administration broadly interpreted Title VII to include anti-discrimination protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. We will look at whether that trend will continue under Trump. Other current trends in anti-discrimination enforcement and litigation will also be discussed, with a focus on statements made by the President-elect and his team during the campaign and the transition.

Register Now

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The Trump wild card: what employers can expect from the new administration

Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Brand-36-Global-Employment-Blog-Banner
What Happens If You Really “Break A Leg!?”

According to the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, “Break a leg!” is something you say to wish someone good luck, especially before they perform in the theatre. Although there are many theories, the derivation of this term is unclear. The expression reflects a theatrical superstition that wishing a person “good luck” is actually considered bad luck. But is it really bad luck if you “break a leg?”

In this month’s edition, we feature articles from eight different countries Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Israel, UK and US. As always, we thank you for you readership.

Read the complete issue

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Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Immigration compliance and the importance of getting it right

Bilfinger_Compliance_Better-think-twice

Verification of all employees’ eligibility for employment in the United States is required, but can result in penalties if  a company reverifies unnecessarily — and discriminatorily.

A US employer agreed to pay $43,000 in civil penalties, undergo training on proper compliance, and submit to monitoring of compliance for 18 months as part of a settlement agreement reached last week with the US Justice Department.

The Justice Department found the employer engaged in discrimination during the employment eligibility verification process when it required lawful permanent residents to reverify their employment eligibility after their alien registration cards expired, as well as requiring permanent residents to produce specific documents.

US law requires employers to verify the identity and employment eligibility of all employees hired.  Reverification is required for employees who are not permanently authorized for employment in the US, such as individuals with temporary visas like H-1B, TN, L-1, etc., as well as those with employment authorization documents.  However, reverification is not required for US citizens and lawful permanent residents, since they are permanently authorized for employment, not withstanding the fact that US passports and alien registration cards generally expire and must be renewed every 10 years.

The US Citizenship and Immigration Services agency provides a list of the acceptable documents to prove identity and employment eligibility.  The law allows the employee to select any documents from the acceptable list and forbids employers from mandating specific documents.  The law prohibits citizenship and national origin discrimination.

For more information, see the Justice Department press release.

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Immigration compliance and the importance of getting it right