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The rights of EU citizens in the UK

The UK government has published a policy paper setting out its offer to EU citizens and their families residing in the UK regarding their right to remain in the country post-Brexit. The offer differs depending on how long a person has been in the UK.

People who have been continuously living in the UK for five years will be able to apply to stay indefinitely by getting “settled status.” A settled status residence document will be issued to prove an individual’s permission to continue living and working in the UK. Those already with an EU permanent residence document will be required to apply. The application process should come online before the UK leaves the EU, hopefully in 2018. The government has pledged to make the process as streamlined and user-friendly as possible.

Other EU citizens in the UK will be subject to a “cut-off date” after which they will no longer be automatically entitled to stay. The date is still to be negotiated, but may fall at any point between March 29, 2017 (the date that Article 50 was triggered) and the date that the UK leaves the EU.

EU citizens who arrived in the UK before the cut-off date, but who have not been here for five years when the UK leaves the EU, will be able to apply to stay temporarily until they have reached the five-year threshold, at which time they also can apply for settled status as set out above.

EU citizens who arrive in the UK after the cut-off date will be able to apply for permission to remain after the UK leaves the EU, under future immigration arrangements for EU citizens. The arrangements have yet to be determined, but the government stated that there should be no expectation by this group of people that they will obtain settled status.

Please visit The Global Mobility Review next month for further information on this development.

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The rights of EU citizens in the UK

Show Me the Money: What the Trump administration’s budget and spending priorities reveal to employers

May 25, 2017
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT
Webinar

Our Employment and Labor team marked the passage of President Trump’s first 100 days with a webinar on May 25, 2017 that looked at whether the president’s budget proposal backed up his prior public statements about wanted changes to employment, benefits and immigration regulations, as well as the impact on employers of the spending bill passed by Congress to prevent a government shutdown. By “following the money,” you can better prepare for future compliance demands and enforcement risks. For your convenience, the program can be viewed in it’s entirety and to register to the webinar by visiting the event page.

We hope you are able to join the program.

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Show Me the Money: What the Trump administration’s budget and spending priorities reveal to employers

New H-1Bs for 2018 are gone

 

US employer demand once again greater than limited supply

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) once again received more H-1B visa petitions (for professional workers) from US employers than the limited supply allocated by Congress for fiscal year 2018.

The agency reported receiving 199,000 petitions during the first five business days of April—37,000 fewer than last year—the first time in years that the number of petitions has fallen.

The selection process was completed on April 11, but the agency did not announce by what date all accepted petition fee receipts would be issued, unselected cap-subject petitions returned with the uncashed filing fee checks, and approval notices for granted petitions sent.

As in years past, USCIS will reject and return filing fees for all unselected petitions that are not duplicate filings. Last year, most returns were received by June.

Congress authorizes USCIS to granted 65,000 H-1B visa petitions per fiscal year, plus an additional 20,000 petitions earmarked only for foreign nationals who earned a graduate degree from an American university. FY2018 starts October 1, 2017. For both of these quotas, the demand was greater than the supply, but USCIS has not provided a breakdown for each.

Certain H-1B visas remain available and USCIS will continue to accept and process petitions to:

  • Approve H-1B status to an individual coming to work for an employer that is exempt from quota limitations—generally the US government, American universities and certain related or nonprofit organization
  • Approve H-1B status to an individual counted previously against the cap and who is not subject to the FY2018 cap
  • Extend the amount of time a current H-1B worker may remain in the United States
  • Change the terms of employment for current H-1B workers
  • Allow current H-1B workers to change employers
  • Allow current H-1B workers to work concurrently in a second H-1B position

The full text of the agency’s press release can be found at the USCIS website.

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New H-1Bs for 2018 are gone

The Trump wild card: what employers can expect from the new administration

Thursday, January 26, 2017
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST
Webinar

With Donald Trump’s election as the 45th president of the United States, and the Republican Party retaining control of both the Senate and House of Representatives, employers can expect some changes.

Join us for an engaging discussion on the Trump administration’s workplace policy priorities, their likely impacts on employers, and what you can do now to prepare for the changes to come. Among the topics to be covered are: the effect on the labor pool of proposed changes in immigration policy; the impact of Obamacare “repeal and replace” on employer-sponsored health plans; compensation issues; the future of regulations covering whistleblowing and human rights protections; the Trump NLRB; the DOL’s Fiduciary Rule; and workplace discrimination. Dentons partner Cynthia Jackson will lead a panel of Dentons lawyers as they tackle these questions and more.

Meeting agenda

Immigration outlook: labor force issues

Campaign promises to increase worksite visa audits and investigations, build a wall along the Mexico border, establish a deportation force, and place new restrictions on immigration from some majority-Muslim countries may become law. The new Administration is likely to adopt policies even before Congress acts. How will these developments impact employers who rely on business visas to hire the best and brightest from around the world? We will predict the future and provide guidance on how employers can prepare now.

The repeal of the ACA and other developments post-ObamaCare

The election of Donald Trump to the presidency, together with Republicans maintaining control of Congress has, for the first time since the Affordable Care Act’s enactment, put the law’s future in serious question. With the new Administration taking the reins of government on January 20, we will discuss the distinct possibility of the ACA’s repeal and replacement, including options for the White House and the expected congressional timeline for debating and passing legislative changes.

Compensation and other DOL regulations

The Department of Labor raced to the end of the Obama administration with a wave of regulatory activity applying to the public sector and government contractors relating to overtime, blacklists, pay equality and sick leave. Courts stalled implementation of some of the more controversial regulations. How will the new administration act in its initial days regarding the recent flurry of regulations?

Whistleblower and human rights developments

During the campaign, President-elect Trump stated that he would dismantle Dodd-Frank, repeal President Obama’s executive orders and unburden companies of excessive regulation. We will address how that will impact whistleblower and bounty hunter programs at the SEC and elsewhere, as well as laws impacting eradication of human trafficking and slavery.

The DOL’s fiduciary rule and the evolution of the NLRB under Trump

The Trump NLRB is expected to reverse recent Board decisions relating to concerted activity, joint employment, election processes and other issues favoring labor. But when will the reversals begin? This presentation will address both NLRB issues and processes during the first year of a Trump presidency. In addition, we will briefly discuss the status and likely future of the DOL’s fiduciary rule.

Workplace discrimination

The Obama administration broadly interpreted Title VII to include anti-discrimination protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. We will look at whether that trend will continue under Trump. Other current trends in anti-discrimination enforcement and litigation will also be discussed, with a focus on statements made by the President-elect and his team during the campaign and the transition.

Register Now

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The Trump wild card: what employers can expect from the new administration

New national interest waiver ruling

greencard

 

Increased immigration opportunities for individuals of exceptional ability

There are increased opportunities for individuals of exceptional ability to immigrate to the United States based on new national interest waiver rule after the US Department of Homeland Security issued on December 27, 2016, designated the Matter of Dhanasar decision as precedent.

Summary

The new rule means that USCIS may grant a national interest waiver if the petitioner demonstrates:

(1) that the foreign national’s proposed endeavor has both (a) substantial merit and (b) national importance;

(2) that he or she is well positioned to advance the proposed endeavor; and

(3) that, on balance, it would be beneficial to the United States to waive the requirement of a job offer and thus of a labor certification.

The employment-based second preference immigrant visa category (EB2) includes individuals of exceptional ability who can self-petition to immigrate.  That means they sign their own immigrant petition and do not need a sponsoring employer. Further, the normal requirement of an employer obtaining an alien employment certification from the US Department of Labor can be waived on a showing that the waiver is in the national interest.

Analysis

The new rule states that “substantial merit” may be in a range of areas, citing business, entrepreneurialism, science, technology, culture, health, or education, research, pure science, and the furtherance of human knowledge as examples.  Showing the potential to create significant economic impact may be favorable, but is not required.

“National importance” focuses on potential prospective impact, rather than geographic terms.  National or global implications are relevant, but even a ventures that focus on one geographic are of the US may qualify.

The requirement that the immigrant be well positioned to advance the proposed endeavor focuses on the immigrant.  Relevant factors include education, skills, knowledge, and record of success in related or similar efforts, plan for future activities, and the interest of others (e.g., potential customers, users, investors).

The benefit to the US is an analysis of both:

  • Impracticality of securing a job offer or alien employment certification; and
  • Benefit of the immigrant’s contributions to the US warrants foregoing the alien employment certification.

Matter of Dhanasar

The immigrant in Matter of Dhanasar held a PhD in Engineering, as well as Master’s degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Physics. His research focused on hypersonic propulsion systems and computational fluid dynamics.  He developed a validated computational model of high-speed air-breathing propulsion engine and a novel numerical method of calculating hypersonic air flow.  He intended to work in air and space propulsion systems R&D at university, as well as supporting teaching activities in STEM disciplines.

The US Citizenship and Immigration Services denied the immigrant petition, but that decision was reversed on appeal to the Administrative Appeals Office.  The AAO found there was both substantial merit and national importance to the immigrant’s work due to potential use in military and civilian applications, advances to scientific knowledge, and American national security and competitiveness applications.  The high level of accomplishment to date by the immigrant was found to show benefit to the US even assuming that other qualified US workers are available.

Matter of New York State Department of Transportation

The new ruling vacates the AAO’s decision in Matter of New York State Department of Transportation, which had been in effect since 1998.  That case severely limited self-sponsored EB2 due to a restrictive interpretation of the national interest waiver requirements, which was often misinterpreted by the USCIS to require the very labor market test that was intended to be waived.

Impact

The new ruling makes the self-petition EB2 national interest waiver much more widely available.  As a result, we anticipate a significant increase in filings, including in some cases where the self-petition EB1 extraordinary ability immigrant visa category might be in consideration.  On the other hand, the EB2 category remains oversubscribed with long waiting periods for immigrants born in mainland China and India.  These individuals will continue to shun EB2 in favor of the more stringent requirements of EB1.

The complete text of Matter of Dhanasar can be found here.

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New national interest waiver ruling

UK announces changes to Immigration Rules

uk-flag-and-passport

On November 3, 2016, the UK Home Office announced several changes to its visa policies. The new Immigration Rules, which go into effect on November 24, will primarily affect Tier 2 migrants and nationals of countries outside the European Economic Area (EEA).

Tier 2

The following changes will affect all certificates of sponsorship assigned by Tier 2 sponsors on or after November 24, 2016:

Increasing the Tier 2 (General) salary threshold for experienced workers to £25,000, with some exemptions

  • Increasing the Tier 2 (Intra-Company Transfer) salary threshold for short-term staff to £30,000
  • Reducing the Tier 2 (Intra-Company Transfer) graduate trainee salary threshold to £23,000, and increasing the number of places to 20 per company per year
  • Closing the Tier 2 (Intra-Company Transfer) skills transfer sub-category

The government has not yet announced a date from which intra-company transfer migrants will be liable for the immigration health surcharge.

Non-EEA partners

The government has introduced a new English-language requirement for non-EEA partners and parents. This affects those applying to extend their stay after 2.5 years in the UK on a five-year route to settlement under Appendix FM (Family Member) of the Immigration Rules (introduced in July 2012).

The new requirement will apply to partners and parents whose current leave under the family Immigration Rules is due to expire on or after May 1, 2017.

The English-language requirement applies to most immigration applications. This includes those seeking to enter the UK for employment under the points-based system, and students seeking to enter the UK under Tier 4 of the points-based system.

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UK announces changes to Immigration Rules

UK Employment Law Round Up, Volume 1, Issue 10 – 2016


UK Employment Law Round-up

In this issue we look at recent case law decisions which have provided a useful reminder of the position when dealing with contracts tainted by illegality and taking prior disciplinary warnings into account. We also bring you up to date with the latest thoughts on calculating holiday pay, and the scope of ACAS Early Conciliation certificates. We review the new judicial assessment procedure in the employment tribunal, along with proposals to inspect corporate governance and to ask employers to disclose employed foreign nationals.

Read the full newsletter here.

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UK Employment Law Round Up, Volume 1, Issue 10 – 2016

UK Visas and Immigration provides premium sponsor licence

uk-visas-and-immigration

For an additional fee of £200, sponsors will be able to subscribe to a new optional premium service.

This will enable sponsors licensed under Tier 2 and Tier 5 to receive expedited review of their sponsor management system (SMS) applications.

This will help sponsors who are frustrated by the long delays in government responses to certain types of SMS requests, including requests for:

  • Annual allocation of Certificates of Sponsorship
  • One-off request for a Certificate of Sponsorship
  • The appointment of a new authorising officer
  • The appointment of a new Level 1 user

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UK Visas and Immigration provides premium sponsor licence

Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Brand-36-Global-Employment-Blog-Banner
What Happens If You Really “Break A Leg!?”

According to the Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, “Break a leg!” is something you say to wish someone good luck, especially before they perform in the theatre. Although there are many theories, the derivation of this term is unclear. The expression reflects a theatrical superstition that wishing a person “good luck” is actually considered bad luck. But is it really bad luck if you “break a leg?”

In this month’s edition, we feature articles from eight different countries Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Israel, UK and US. As always, we thank you for you readership.

Read the complete issue

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Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 2 – Fall 2016

Tax consequences for multinationals sending employees to Canada

US-and-Canada-flag-puzzle

Multinational corporations sending employees to foreign countries on business must be alert to the legal responsibilities that can arise from such transfers. Dentons partner Emmanuel Sala clarifies the Canadian and Quebec fiscal rules and mechanisms that govern US parent corporations with US employees employed in Canada. His article covers both Canadian federal and Quebec provincial payroll tax obligations. Regarding Canadian federal tax obligations, Emmanuel notes that if a US parent corporation is determined to have a “permanent establishment” (PE) in Canada, business profits attributable to the PE would be subject to Canadian federal income tax and various forms of tax relief would become unavailable. He provides an in-depth review of the most common situations that might give rise to a PE determination, including fixed-base, agency, construction-site and service. Emmanuel also discusses the possibility of implementing secondment arrangements to mitigate the risk of a PE determination.

Click to read article.

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Tax consequences for multinationals sending employees to Canada