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Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 1 – November/December 2015

Global Employment Lawyer - Nov. & Dec. 2015

 

Look out, beware—it’s holiday party season!

For many companies, having an annual holiday party is part of the culture and tradition of the organization. Company holiday parties provide employees with an opportunity to socialize and celebrate together, and can certainly help boost morale and engender loyalty. At the same time, however, there are risks lurking. Depending on the type of party and the part of the world you are having it in, there are different types of risks that can come into play—and we have some tips to mitigate them.

What’s not risky? Keeping up to date on the hot topics in employment and labor issues from around the globe which could affect your business goals in those regions.

From all of your friends at Dentons, we wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous holiday season!

Read the complete issue

 

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Global Employment Lawyer – Volume 2, Issue 1 – November/December 2015

Global Employment Lawyer – Issue 3

Summer 2015

Global Employment Lawyer

The third edition of the Global Employment Lawyer provides you with practical content to keep you current on developments that effect your business goals around the globe. Our lawyers look at questions of religious accommodation as well as the unpleasant income tax consequences of temporary visas in the US; managing “difficult employees” in Canada; reducing workforce due to redundancies in China; imminent changes to Polish labor law; recruitment of non-resident foreign workers in Angola; employing foreign workers in Israel and whistleblowing in the UK.

Read more

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Global Employment Lawyer – Issue 3

Global Mobility Guide

 

Global Mobility Guide

We are so pleased to bring you the Dentons Global Mobility Guide 2015.

The ability to move skilled workers globally is essential to the success of the world economy and the companies that drive it.

“Global mobility” minimizes the risks for doing business internationally by providing the legal framework to identify and analyze business problems, and develop and implement creative solutions. Getting it right means getting people to the right place at the right time with the right advice.

The laws impacting global mobility are dynamic. Multinational employers need to know the existing laws and the evolving legal trends to compete in an international market where business transcends borders. Dentons professionals can provide that.

Our Global Mobility practice helps multinational employers navigate the local laws of the countries where they do business, with lawyers speaking the local language in more than 75 locations around the world, well-versed in all of the intertwined issues: immigration, employment, compensation, employee benefits, taxation and social insurance.

Dentons’ network of offices and qualified staff around the world provides you with experienced legal resources—wherever and whenever you need us.

Read the complete report

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Global Mobility Guide

One week away: Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Labour-2-(ThinkStock)

With one week left, click here to register for our CLE program on Critical Employment Issues Facing Multi-National Employers.

December 10, 2014
04:00 PM – 07:00 PM EDT
1221 Avenue of the Americas
50th Floor
New York, NY
United States

Dentons Global Employment and Labor group is pleased to invite you to an interactive program bringing together Dentons lawyers from around the globe to present on several critical employment issues facing multi-national employers. The three-panel program will be followed by networking cocktails where you will have an opportunity to mingle and connect with professionals in the industry.

Panel topics and speakers:

Moderated by Brian Cousin

Privacy Panel (4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.):
Andy Roth (US), Barbara Johnston (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France),Todd Liao (China by video), Neil Capobianco (US)

Global Mobility Panel (5:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.):
Matt Schulz (US), Michael Bronstein (UK), Todd Liao (China by video)

Restrictive Covenants Panel (6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.):
Richard Scharlat (US), Adrian Miedema (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video)

Register Now

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One week away: Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Employment updates from around the globe

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We are proud to offer you the initial issue of Dentons’ Global Employment Lawyer.

Whether you are an employer, human resources executive, in-house or outside counsel, mobility professional, or anyone interested in employment and labor issues around the globe, our goal is to keep you informed of trends and developments in the area of global employment law.

In this issue, our lawyers examine:

  • The task of crafting a non-compete clause under English law which is not unreasonably broad in scope, so as to be enforceable in court,  without risking unwanted commercial consequences for employers;
  • Likely changes to fixed-term employment contracts in Poland in the wake of a recent European Court of Justice determination finding them inconsistent with EU law, and some updates on key global developments in the region;
  • Recent legislation in the UAE requiring all employers in Dubai to provide employees with compulsory health care insurance;
  • Hidden US tax issues arising from new IRS regulations that consider severance payments made after signing a release potentially to be “deferred” compensation;
  • and many more topics.

Read the complete issue.

 

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Employment updates from around the globe

The Battle Against Corruption Has Gone Global, in a Big Way

Handcuffed man with euro banknotes

Global corporations and sophisticated international business people have long been aware of the risk of corruption and the potential liability that risk creates under the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).  This liability is both civil and criminal, corporate and personal, and can result in millions — and in some cases billions– of dollars in fines and penalties, not to mention years of imprisonment in federal penitentiaries for corporate executives.  The ever increasing mobility of corporate employees and executives has increased this risk as they have face-to-face encounters with different cultural and legal expectations of customers, government officials, and colleagues around the world.

For a long time, the US Department of Justice was a lone wolf, actively pursuing corruption around the world committed by US and foreign businesses and business people.   In recent years it was joined by the Securities and Exchange Commission which moved from occasional enforcement of the FCPA to creating a dedicated unit focused on pursuing corruption committed by publicly traded corporations.

But the United States doesn’t want to be alone, and has pushed for international adoption of anti-corruption sanctions through international organizations like the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and by putting pressure on its allies.  This effort has succeeded in a big way — in recent years, anti-corruption legislation has been adopted or invigorated around the world , not just among close US allies like in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, but also in the so-called BRIC economies of Brazil, Russia, India, and China.

Moreover, the traditional American approach of focusing on public corruption—the payment of bribes to public officials for business advantage—is being supplanted, even in the US, by efforts to pursue all forms of  corruption, whether the bribe is paid to a public official or a private person.  Meanwhile many nations are also pursing corporations for the related misconduct of maintaining inaccurate corporate financial records to hide corporate bribery.  In short, the fight against corruption has been taken up by many nations, using many tools, and fighting many forms of bribery.

Money under table (2)

But corporations and those involved in international business should not despair.  Despite the complexity of the various schemes around the world, the focus on different prosecutorial tools, and enforcement priorities, it is not difficult to build a single, simple, straight-forward global policy to prevent, deter, and detect corruption that not only recognizes the practical reality of international business, but can actually increase opportunity and profitability.

Exchange

For more on global anti-corruption laws click here.  To see the Dentons Global Anti-Corruption Team click here.

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The Battle Against Corruption Has Gone Global, in a Big Way