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UK General Election–immigration manifesto

What’s going to happen to UK immigration in a post-Brexit era? That’s the million-dollar question. While there has been huge speculation as to what our immigration system and net migration figures are likely to look like going forward, little clarity has been provided as yet.

Jeremy Corbyn has sent the message that he intends to toughen up on immigration. The Labour Party has acknowledged that free movement of workers across borders is likely to not be possible once the UK leaves the EU, but has stated that imposing new immigration controls will not be at the top of its list of priorities if it wins the election. It’s not really clear where that message leaves us when trying to predict what the new model is going to look like.

The Conservatives, for their part, have indicated that they will stick by pledges made in David Cameron’s 2010 manifesto to cut migration to “tens of thousands,” despite having missed the target after making the same promise in 2010 and 2015. Again, it’s not clear from their rhetoric how they hope to achieve this, although Prime Minister Theresa May has reiterated that when the UK leaves the EU, the nation will have the opportunity to make sure it has control of its borders.

Meanwhile, the UK Independence Party (UKIP) has gone one step further, as it is prone to do, pledging to cut net migration levels to zero within five years by asking skilled workers and students to get visas and banning migration into the UK for unskilled and low skilled workers. This time it’s not clear how UKIP intend to do the math to achieve a net migration level of zero.

And then there are the Liberal Democrats who are against stricter migration controls. Tim Farron, their leader, recently tweeted that “immigration is a blessing and not a curse.”

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UK General Election–immigration manifesto

Travel ban executive order – the saga continues

The US Departments of State and Homeland Security both issued statements on February 6, 2017, confirming that the government has suspended the implementation of key provisions of President Trump’s travel ban on nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries, and that visas that had been provisionally revoked are now valid for travel and may be used, once again, to come to the US, subject to the normal laws and procedures that existed prior to the President Trump’s executive order dated January 27, 2017.

This action comes as a result of a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision in State of Washington and State of Minnesota v. Trump, denying a US Department of Justice request for an immediate stay of a nationwide injunction granted by a US federal district court judge in Seattle in response to Washington State’s request for a temporary restraining order immediately halting implementation and enforcement of the immigration ban.

The EO initially barred the entry to the United States of lawful permanent residents with green cards, and imposes a 90-day suspension of admission for immigrant and nonimmigrant visa holders, and refugees and passport holders from the seven countries. Soon thereafter, the Department of State issued an urgent notice suspending visa issuance to citizens of those countries. The EO also suspended the resettlement of refugees from all countries to the US for 120 days, and bans Syrian refugees indefinitely.

Previous injunctions had been issued in federal courts in Massachusetts and New York. Those orders temporarily enjoined federal agencies from removing people with approved refugee applications, valid visas and the nationals from the seven Muslim countries. The Seattle court’s decision is the broadest and has the largest impact.

Citizens from these countries are impacted

Nationals from the following countries are detrimentally impacted:

  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Libya
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Syria
  • Yemen

The EO does not apply to citizens of other countries who merely visited the listed countries. Further, the US Customs and Border Protection Agency has stated that the EO does not apply to citizens of these seven countries, if they are dual citizens and use the passport of a non-affected country to enter the US.

Travel guidance

Nationals from the seven listed countries, including dual citizens traveling with the passport of another country and US permanent residents, may wish to delay travel to the US until the details of the implementation of the EO are more clear, even if they already hold a visa to enter the United States. If in the United States already, they may wish to defer departure as they may not be allowed to return or they may find themselves going through a more lengthy than usual secondary inspection on arrival in the US. There are also reports of airline personnel being understandably confused regarding the status of the EO, with resulting inconvenience to travelers.

Background

On February 4, President Trump tweeted the following about the Hon. James L. Robart, the district court judge who issued the nationwide order. “The opinion of this so-called judge, which essentially takes law-enforcement away from our country, is ridiculous and will be overturned!”

Criticism of the tweet and the EO was immediate and widespread. Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) said, “The President’s hostility toward the rule of law is not just embarrassing, it is dangerous. He seems intent on precipitating a constitutional crisis.” Senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) said: “We fear this executive order will become a self-inflicted wound in the fight against terrorism.”

Broad media coverage of the confusion caused by the uncertainty surrounding the EO’s fate continues. Dentons continues to receive emails and calls from employers who are considering cancelling all travel for employees carrying passports from the impacted countries, including dual citizens and US lawful permanent residents. Similar concerns have been voiced by citizens of many countries that are not listed in the EO but are worried that their country might be next. Due to the reciprocal nature of diplomatic relations, it is likely that US passport holders traveling to the seven countries will experience similar difficulties upon their arrival. Iran, for its part, has said, it would stop US citizens entering the country in retaliation to Washington’s visa ban.

Dentons will issue further information as it becomes available.

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Travel ban executive order – the saga continues

H-1B blast off countdown 2017

T minus 59 days. The countdown has begun.  The date is coming.  It will be here soon.

It is the biggest event of the year in United States immigration.

Hundreds of thousands will apply, but only a lucky few will be chosen.  Employers keen to recruit and employ the best and brightest talent from around the globe to meet American business needs are already gearing up.  Professionals eager to pursue their career in the United States are updating resumes and collecting diplomas and reference letters.  This program is not the best way for a country to succeed, but the United States Congress continues to lack the will and wisdom to change a law almost 25 years old.

Are you ready?

April 1, 2017, is the first day that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services agency (USCIS) will accept new H-1B specialty occupation worker nonimmigrant visa petitions by employers for foreign professionals.  It is important for global mobility and human resource managers to start work now to secure preliminary Department of Labor approvals, foreign degree evaluations, etc., to be ready to file the petition for an April 1 receipt date.

Limited supply

Only a limited number of new H-1B visas are accepted each year due to legal quota restrictions. Every year, 65,000 new H-1B visa petitions can be granted, of which 6,800 are set aside for citizens of Chile and Singapore under free trade agreements with those countries. To the extent there were unused free trade agreement H-1Bs, those are added to the quota for the next fiscal year. There is an additional allocation of 20,000 new H-1B visa petitions that can be accepted if the foreign professional in question earned a graduate degree from a university in the United States.

Not all H-1B visa petitions are subject to numerical limits. Individuals already holding H-1B visas are not counted against the quota, and petitions filed by institutions of higher education or related or affiliated nonprofit entities, nonprofit research organizations or governmental research organizations are exempt from the limits. And H-1B workers performing labor or services in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) and Guam may also be exempt from the H-1B cap, provided their employers file the petition before December 31, 2019. Employers may not file a petition or an extension request for an employee more than six months before the employee’s intended start date.

Overwhelming demand

Last year, the USCIS received so many new H-1B visa petitions in the first week of April that the agency ended the application window on April 7. Approximately 236,000 new petitions were received, as compared to 233,000 in the prior year. As the regulations mandate, officers then selected—at random—which envelopes to open, and returned the rest unopened with the government filing fees. Only then did the agency begin the often long process of approving or denying the selected petitions on the merits of eligibility.

This year, the USCIS will once again receive more than it is allowed to accept. Again, the agency will randomly decide which envelopes to open and which to return unopened. The likelihood of a petition being selected in April 2017 is much lower than last year, taking into consideration the current state of the economy, the relatively low rate of American unemployment in typical H-1B specialty occupations, and the labor needs of US employers.

The countdown begins now (download dates directly into your Outlook)

T minus 59 days (February 1):  Start working with legal counsel now. Identify current and prospective employees who will need new H-1B visa petitions.

T minus 44 days (February 15):  By now, you and legal counsel should have requested the labor condition application certification from the Department of Labor.  Employers new to the process or who have not filed recently will need to create the appropriate accounts with the Department of Labor. Because the USCIS relies on Dunn & Bradstreet data (DUNS) as part of its employer background verification process, it is important for employers to create or update the company’s DUNS records to avoid inconsistencies with H-1B visa petition filings.

T minus 31 days (March 1):  Have all the required USCIS forms and supporting documents been signed and filing fee checks prepared?  There is still some time left to get last minute details completed, but this is when it gets very hectic. Government systems often become overloaded and delays at the Department of Labor for late filings are common.

T minus 1 day (March 31):  Envelopes should be properly addressed and delivered to the express service of choice with next business morning delivery instructions.

T minus 0 (April 1):  Just like at NASA ground control, this is the stage in the process where all the hard work resulted in successful delivery of the visa petition and you have to wait for the USCIS to announce whether the petition is selected or returned—usually within 3 weeks or so.

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H-1B blast off countdown 2017

US proposes new immigration status for international entrepreneurs

Start up

In addition to the many legal solutions already in place to make visas and other immigration opportunities available to qualified entrepreneurs, there will be an additional way to allow entrepreneurs to live and work in the United States for up to two years if a new rule proposed by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on August 26, 2016, goes into effect. Savvy entrepreneurs will continue to make use of existing law whenever possible, but the proposed International Entrepreneur Rule could create a much needed important new immigration benefit.

The key provisions of the new rule include:

  • DHS may grant the parole in the exercise of its discretionary authority on a case-by-case basis if the evidence shows that the applicant’s presence in the US will provide a significant public benefit;
  • The applicant must submit biometric information and may be denied if there is any derogatory information, such as criminal activity or national security concerns; and
  • The startup must have been formed in the US within the past three years; and
  • The startup must have substantial and demonstrated potential for rapid business growth and job creation, as shown by any of the following:
    • At least $345,000 in capital investment from certain qualified investor(s) with established records of successful investments within 365 days immediately preceding the parole application; or
    • Receipt of significant awards or grants of at least $100,000 from certain federal, state or local government entities within 365 days immediately preceding the parole application; or
    • Partial satisfaction of one or both of the above, plus other reliable and compelling evidence of the startup’s substantial potential for rapid growth and job creation.
  • The applicant must have an ownership interest in the startup of at least 15% and must maintain at least 10% ownership at all times during the parole; and
  • The applicant must have a role that is both active and central to operations that uses the applicant’s knowledge, skills or experience to substantially assist the startup.

“Qualified investor” includes an investor who is a US citizen or lawful permanent resident, or any organization located in the US that operates through a legal entity organized under the laws of the US or any state and is majority owned and controlled, directly or indirectly, by US citizens and residents, but only if such investor regularly makes substantial investments in startups that subsequently exhibit substantial growth in terms of revenue or jobs creation. Further, the investor must, during the five preceding years:

  • Have made investments in startups, in exchange for equity or convertible debt, in at least three separate calendar years comprising a total of not less than $1 million; and
  • At least two of these startups must each have:
    • Created at least five qualified jobs of at least 35 hours per week, in the US and for a US citizen, resident or other immigrant (not including the applicant and the applicant’s parent, spouse, sibling, son or daughter); or
    • Generated at least $500,000 in revenue with average annualized revenue growth of at least 20%.

Not counted as part of the $345,000 investment requirement is any investment by the applicant, or the applicant’s parents, spouse, brother, sister, son or daughter, or any company in which the applicant or those relatives, directly or indirectly, has an ownership interest.

The applicant entrepreneur and his or her spouse and children would be granted an initial stay of up to two years. An extension of the initial stay of up to three additional years is available, but only if the applicant and the startup continue to provide a significant public benefit as shown by substantial increases in capital investment, revenue or job creation. DHS’s proposed additional requirements for the extension generally require additional qualifying investment, creation of at least 10 qualified jobs, or generation of $500,000 in annual revenue, and annual revenue growth averaging 20%.

The proposed rule expressly states that there is no appeal from a denial, nor will the agency consider a motion to reopen or reconsider a denial decision.

The proposed new rule is not any type of immigrant visa or green card, nor is it a new type of temporary visa. Rather, the DHS is utilizing its discretionary parole authority As a way to authorize qualified foreign nationals to travel in and out of the US without a visa. A grant of parole does not confer immigrant status and does not allow a change to another temporary visa status within the US or an adjustment to a permanent resident (green card) status within the US. Parolees are not automatically authorized for employment in the US, but may apply to the USCIS for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD).

Parole authority to allow temporary entry to the US is not new. It is often used for humanitarian reasons, such as to allow aliens to receive urgent medical treatment, to visit a seriously ill American relative or attend an American relative’s funeral, to cooperate with law enforcement, to participate in a voluntary disaster relief effort, etc. However, given the unusual application of the parole authority to international entrepreneurs instead of creating a new visa classification through legislative action and especially in the current US election period, the future of this proposed application of parole authority is very unclear. Other extraordinary uses of agency authority by https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/le-viagra-feminin/ the DHS have been delayed and halted by court order. It is disappointing that the agency chose to use this controversial approach to solve the very important need the US has for better immigration solutions for entrepreneurs.

There is a 45-day public comment period from the date that the proposed rule is published in the Federal Register. The USCIS may change the terms of the proposed rule after review of the public comments. The agency did not state when a final rule will be issued, but there is little time in the current administration and the long-term future of this proposal very much depends on the position taken by next Presidential administration.

Read the full proposed rule at the USCIS website.

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US proposes new immigration status for international entrepreneurs

Free movement a thing of the past?

passport home office 2

The “Brexit” debate will be on the minds of EEA nationals who have moved to the UK for work. Those who have been here for some time will be concerned that they could lose their right to remain in the UK. A change in the regulations governing the rights of European nationals is fueling this concern. In November 2015, European nationals lost the automatic acquisition of permanent cialis how does it work residence after five years exercising treaty rights in the http://www.cialisgeneriquefr24.com/cialis-generique-ou-acheter/ UK.

Now a European national must make an application for confirmation of permanent residence if he or she wishes 12 months later to apply for naturalization as a British citizen. This means the national will have to make two applications and wait 12 months between each application.

Although this extra burden could be unfavourable to any Europeans wanting a British passport, the likelihood is that protecting the Europeans who are in the UK will form part of the negotiations of any Brexit. Similarly, thought will need to be given during negotiations to those British nationals who are living in other European countries.

Since there is some ambiguity, we recommend that European nationals act now to secure confirmation of their status.

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Free movement a thing of the past?

New rule extends US work authorization for certain foreign students

STEM image Professional

Important new US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regulations allow F-1 foreign student visa holders with degrees from American universities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) to extend optional practical training (OPT) for 24 months beyond the 12-month period generally available to F-1 students on OPT. This 24-month extension effectively replaces the 17-month STEM OPT previously available. The new rule is effective May 10, 2016.

Requirements

To qualify:

  1. The employer must be enrolled in the voluntary e-verify program (see USCIS website)
  2. The student must have completed a bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree in a STEM field
  3. The job offered must directly relate to the student’s STEM degree

Transition rules

Pending STEM OPT extension applications adjudicated prior to May 10, 2016, will only be valid for 17 months. Beginning on May 10, US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will issue Requests for Further Evidence asking students with pending STEM OPT extension applications whether they wish to amend their application from 17 to 24 months—perhaps one of the few times when lengthy government processing times will benefit students.

The new rule gives students with pending applications the option to withdraw now and file a new application with a 24-month request, but with the important reminder that a student can only file for a STEM OPT extension if post-completion OPT has not expired prior to government receipt of a new STEM OPT application.

Also, students who already have received a 17-month STEM EAD will be able to file for a 7-month extension between May 10, 2016 and August 8, 2016, so long as 150 days still exist before the expiration of their 17-month STEM EAD and they file within 60 days of the date their Designated School Official (DSO) enters the recommendation for the 24-month STEM OPT extension into the student’s SEVIS record and other requirements are met, and they meet all other requirements for the 24-month STEM OPT extension.

Background

An August 2015 blog post offers background about F-1 OPT, STEM OPT extensions and the litigation that called into question the validity of the old 17-month rule.

We also addressed this issue in October 2015, when DHS first published the proposed rule to address the litigation.

The new rule was expressly written to resolve the defects found in the administrative procedures used to pass the old rule. In addition to reviving the STEM OPT extension in compliance with required rulemaking procedures, DHS took the opportunity make the validity period even longer. This is certainly not the result desired by those who challenged the original rule in an attempt to limit executive authority to grant US employment authorization to foreign nationals.

Further information

The complete text of the DHS notice of the new rule is available at the Federal Register’s website. Furthermore, DHS has opened a website that contains more information on the new STEM rule.

Dentons lawyers help employers obtain and maintain E-Verify status, as well as regular and STEM OPT employment authorization document applications, employment eligibility verification I-9 records and visas to authorize employment in the US and in the more than 50 countries around the world where Dentons has offices.

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New rule extends US work authorization for certain foreign students

H-1B blast off countdown 2016

T minus 72 days. The countdown has begun.  The date is coming.  It will be here soon.

It is the biggest event of the year in United States immigration.

Hundreds of thousands will apply, but only a lucky few will be chosen.  Employers keen to recruit and employ the best and brightest talent from around the globe to meet American business needs are already gearing up.  Professionals eager to pursue their career in the United States are updating resumes and collecting diplomas and reference letters.  This program is not the best way for a country to succeed, but the United States Congress continues to lack the will and wisdom to change a law almost 25 years old.

Are you ready?

April 1, 2016, is the first day that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services agency (USCIS) will accept new H-1B specialty occupation worker nonimmigrant visa petitions by employers for foreign professionals.  It is important for global mobility and human resource managers to start work now to secure preliminary Department of Labor approvals, foreign degree evaluations, etc., to be ready to file the petition for an April 1 receipt date.

Limited supply

Only a limited number of new H-1B visas are accepted each year due to legal quota restrictions.  Every year, 65,000 new H-1B visa petitions can be granted, of which 6,800 are set aside for citizens of Chile and Singapore under Free Trade Agreements with those countries. To the extent there were unused Free Trade Agreement H-1Bs, those are added to the quota for the next fiscal year.  There is an additional allocation of 20,000 new H-1B visa petitions that can be accepted if the foreign professional earned a graduate degree from a university in the United States.

Not all H-1B visa petitions are subject to numerical limits. Individuals already holding H-1B visas are counted against the quota, and petitions filed by institutions of higher education or related or affiliated nonprofit entities, nonprofit research organizations or governmental research organizations are exempt from the limits. The exemption for petitions filed for jobs only in Guam or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands expired on December 31, 2015.

Overwhelming demand

Last year, the USCIS received so many new H-1B visa petitions in the first week of April that the agency ended the application window on April 7.  Approximately 233,000 new petitions were received, as compared to 172,500 in the prior year.  As the regulations mandate, officers then selected—at random—which envelopes to open and returned the rest unopened with the government filing fees.  Only then did the agency begin the often long process to approve or deny the selected petitions on the merits of eligibility.

This year, the USCIS will once again receive more than they are allowed to accept.  Again, the agency will randomly decide the envelopes to open and those to return unopened.  The likelihood of a petition being selected in April 2016 is likely to be much, much lower than last year, taking into consideration the current state of the economy, the relatively low rate of American unemployment in typical H-1B specialty occupations, and the labor needs of United States employers.

The countdown begins now (download dates directly into your Outlook)

launch

T minus 72 days (January 19):  Start working with legal counsel now.  Identify current and prospective employees who will need new H-1B visa petitions.

T minus 45 days (February 15):  By now, you and legal counsel should have requested the labor condition application certification from the Department of Labor.  Employers new to the process or who have not filed recently will need to create the appropriate accounts with the Department of Labor. Because the USCIS relies on Dunn & Bradstreet data (DUNS) as part of its employer background verification process, it is important for employers to create or update the company’s DUNS records to avoid inconsistencies with H-1B visa petition filings.

T minus 30 days (March 1):  Have all the required USCIS forms and supporting documents been signed and filing fee checks prepared?  There is still some time left to get last minute details completed, but this is when it gets very hectic.  Government systems often become overloaded and delays at the Department of Labor for late filings are common.

T minus 1 day (March 31):  Envelopes should be properly addressed and delivered to the express service of choice with next business morning delivery instructions.

T minus 0 (April 1):  Just like at NASA ground control, this is the stage in the process where all the hard work resulted in successful delivery of the visa petition and you have to wait for the USCIS to announce whether the petition is selected or returned—usually within 3 weeks or so.

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H-1B blast off countdown 2016

Global Mobility Guide

 

Global Mobility Guide

We are so pleased to bring you the Dentons Global Mobility Guide 2015.

The ability to move skilled workers globally is essential to the success of the world economy and the companies that drive it.

“Global mobility” minimizes the risks for doing business internationally by providing the legal framework to identify and analyze business problems, and develop and implement creative solutions. Getting it right means getting people to the right place at the right time with the right advice.

The laws impacting global mobility are dynamic. Multinational employers need to know the existing laws and the evolving legal trends to compete in an international market where business transcends borders. Dentons professionals can provide that.

Our Global Mobility practice helps multinational employers navigate the local laws of the countries where they do business, with lawyers speaking the local language in more than 75 locations around the world, well-versed in all of the intertwined issues: immigration, employment, compensation, employee benefits, taxation and social insurance.

Dentons’ network of offices and qualified staff around the world provides you with experienced legal resources—wherever and whenever you need us.

Read the complete report

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Global Mobility Guide

H-1B Blast Off Countdown

T minus 84 days. The countdown has begun.  The date is coming.  It will be here soon.

It is the biggest event of the year in United States immigration.

Hundreds of thousands will apply, but only a lucky few will be chosen.  Employers keen to recruit and employ the best and brightest talent from around the globe to meet American business needs are already gearing up.  Professionals eager to pursue their career in the United States are updating resumes and collecting diplomas and reference letters.  This program is not the best way for a country to succeed, but the United States Congress continues to lack the will and wisdom to change a law almost 25 years old.

Are you ready?

April 1, 2015, is the first day that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services agency (USCIS) will accept new H-1B specialty occupation worker nonimmigrant visa petitions by employers for foreign professionals.  It is important for global mobility and human resource managers to start work now to secure preliminary Department of Labor approvals, foreign degree evaluations, etc., to be ready to file the petition for an April 1 receipt date.

Limited Supply

Only a limited number of new H-1B visas are accepted each year due to legal quota restrictions.  Every year, 65,000 new H-1B visa petitions can be granted, of which 6,800 are set aside for citizens of Chile and Singapore under Free Trade Agreements with those countries. To the extent there were unused Free Trade Agreement H-1Bs, those are added to the quota for the next fiscal year.  There is an additional allocation of 20,000 new H-1B visa petitions that can be accepted if the foreign professional earned a graduate degree from a university in the United States.

Not all H-1B visa petitions are subject to numerical limits. Individuals already holding H-1B visas are counted again the quota, and petitions filed by institutions of higher education or related or affiliated nonprofit entities, nonprofit research organizations or governmental research organizations are exempt from the limits.  In addition, petitions filed for jobs only in Guam or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands are exempt from the cap until December 31, 2015.

Overwhelming Demand

Last year, the USCIS received so many new H-1B visa petitions in the first week of April that the agency ended the application window on April 5.  Approximately 172,500 new petitions were received, as compared to 124,000 in the prior year.  As the regulations mandate, officers then selected — at random — which envelopes to open and returned the rest unopened with the government filing fees.  Only then did the agency begin the often long process to approve or deny the selected petitions on the merits of eligibility.

This year, the USCIS will once again receive more than they are allowed to accept.  Again, the agency will randomly decide the envelopes to open and those to return unopened.  The likelihood of a petition being selected in April 2015 is likely to be much, much lower than last year, taking into consideration the current state of the economy, the relatively low rate of American unemployment in typical H-1B specialty occupations, and the labor needs of United States employers.

The Countdown Begins Now (download dates directly into your Outlook) 

launch

T minus 84 days (January 7):  Start working with legal counsel now.  Identify current and prospective employees who will need new H-1B visa petitions.

T minus 60 days (February 1):  You and your legal counsel should be working together to prepare job descriptions, determine prevailing wage rates, secure equivalency evaluations of foreign degrees and work experience, and translate key documents.

T minus 45 days (February 15):  By now, you and legal counsel should have requested the labor condition application certification from the Department of Labor.  Employers new to the process or who have not filed recently will need to create the appropriate accounts with the Department of Labor. Because the USCIS relies on Dunn & Bradstreet data (DUNS) as part of its employer background verification process, it is important for employers to create or update the company’s DUNS records to avoid inconsistencies with H-1B visa petition filings.

T minus 30 days (March 1):  Have all the required USCIS forms and supporting documents been signed and filing fee checks prepared?  There is still some time left to get last minute details completed, but this is when it gets very hectic.  Government systems often become overloaded and delays at the Department of Labor for late filings are common.

T minus 1 day (March 31):  Envelopes should be properly addressed and delivered to the express service of choice with next business morning delivery instructions.

T minus 0 (April 1):  Just like at NASA ground control, this is the stage in the process where all the hard work resulted in successful delivery of the visa petition and you have to wait for the USCIS to announce whether the petition is selected or returned — usually within 3 weeks or so.

liftoff

 

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H-1B Blast Off Countdown

Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

trade-customs1

Last week Dentons held its program on employment issues facing multi-national companies. For your convenience, the program can be viewed in it’s entirety by visiting the event page.

Dentons event

If you are interested in receiving additional information on Dentons’ Employment practice and/or have topic suggestions for future seminars, please contact Jennifer Gonzales-Frisbie, Business Development Manager, at jennifer.gonzales‑frisbie@dentons.com.

We hope to see you at our next program.

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Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers