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Disclosing bribery conduct not an easy decision for US companies

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July 8, 2016

Recent non-prosecution agreements between the US Securities and Exchange Commission and two companies—Akamai Technologies, Inc. and Nortek, Inc.—in matters involving FCPA books and records violations stemming from conduct that occurred in China, coupled with corresponding decisions by the US Department of Justice to close its investigations into these two matters, provide some limited insight into how to secure similar resolutions of future investigations. However, the questions that remain regarding the benefits of voluntary disclosure of an organization’s misconduct leave things clear as mud.

Should a US company faced with evidence of bribery by an employee or other agent self report in this post-Yates Memorandum/post-FCPA Pilot Program era? Read more in this client alert by Dentons white collar partners Stephen L. Hill, Michelle J. Shapiro and Brian O’Bleness.

Click to read complete article.

 

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Disclosing bribery conduct not an easy decision for US companies

US Visa Bulletin Update—EB-1 backlogs predicted

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Effective August 1, 2016, the employment-based, first-preference immigrant visa (EB-1) is no longer expected to be immediately available for individuals born in India and China. Availability is predicted by the State Department to retrogress to January 1, 2010, and to not become current again until the new fiscal year begins on October 1, 2016. EB-1 will remain current and immediately available to individuals born in all other countries.

EB-1 includes:

  • EB-1A – Individuals of extraordinary ability
  • EB-1B – Outstanding professors and researchers
  • EB-1C – Multinational executives and managers

EB-1 was created as part of the Immigration Act of 1990. This important visa category has, since its creation, generally been immediately available and without any quota backlog. Employment-based immigration in other visa categories has long been slower for immigrants born in India and China due to the large number of applications filed each year.

Although the backlog is not expected to hit until the last two months of the current fiscal year, it is reasonable to assume that, with the anticipated continued growth of immigration to the US from India and China, it will only worsen in fiscal year 2017. While it is difficult to predict how quickly the wait list will grow, to avoid what may become very lengthy processing delays, your best strategy for securing an early priority date is to file your EB-1 immigrant visa petition as soon as possible.

The EB-2 (for professionals with advanced degrees) and EB-3 (for professionals and skilled workers) visa categories already retrogressed in June for individuals born in China and no forward movement is likely for the rest of the fiscal year, but then resume movement forward in October 2016 – no specific date identified, but I estimate it will be current for at least the first six months of fiscal year 2017 (i.e., until April 2017).

EB-2 worldwide is expected to have a cut-off date in the September Visa Bulletin, but the State Department has not yet predicted a specific date.

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US Visa Bulletin Update—EB-1 backlogs predicted

Global Employment Lawyer – Issue 3

Summer 2015

Global Employment Lawyer

The third edition of the Global Employment Lawyer provides you with practical content to keep you current on developments that effect your business goals around the globe. Our lawyers look at questions of religious accommodation as well as the unpleasant income tax consequences of temporary visas in the US; managing “difficult employees” in Canada; reducing workforce due to redundancies in China; imminent changes to Polish labor law; recruitment of non-resident foreign workers in Angola; employing foreign workers in Israel and whistleblowing in the UK.

Read more

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Global Employment Lawyer – Issue 3

EB-5 China backlog

Now later

The United States State Department announced in the May 2015 Visa Bulletin that conditional resident status based on the EB-5 immigrant investor visa is currently available only to individuals born in China whose I-526 immigrant petitions were received on or before May 1, 2013.  EB-5 remains immediately available to immigrants born in all other countries.  Further, this backlog does not impact pending I-526 and I-829 petitions, regardless of country of birth.

The fiscal year begins on October 1.  According to the State Department’s Visa Control and Reporting Division Chief, 2,525 EB-5 visas remain available this fiscal year to people born in all countries other than China.  China has already used 6,819  or 88.56% of the EB-5 allotment for this fiscal year.  Vietnam is the second largest user this year, with a mere 244 EB-5 visas, followed by Taiwan, India and South Korea.  The State Department anticipates that the other countries will not use up all of the remaining EB-5 visas and estimates about 1,000 more EB-5 visas will be released to immigrants from China before the current fiscal year ends on September 30, 2015.

EB-5 immigrants from all countries can continue to file and obtain approval of I-526 immigrant petitions.  In fact, filing the I-526 as early as possible is more important than ever, since it is the I-526 receipt, also known as the priority date, that is ultimately used for quota purposes.  Approximately 10,000 new EB-5 visas will become available on October 1, 2015, when the new fiscal year begins.

For more information, check out the May 2015 Visa Bulletin.

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EB-5 China backlog

One week away: Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Labour-2-(ThinkStock)

With one week left, click here to register for our CLE program on Critical Employment Issues Facing Multi-National Employers.

December 10, 2014
04:00 PM – 07:00 PM EDT
1221 Avenue of the Americas
50th Floor
New York, NY
United States

Dentons Global Employment and Labor group is pleased to invite you to an interactive program bringing together Dentons lawyers from around the globe to present on several critical employment issues facing multi-national employers. The three-panel program will be followed by networking cocktails where you will have an opportunity to mingle and connect with professionals in the industry.

Panel topics and speakers:

Moderated by Brian Cousin

Privacy Panel (4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.):
Andy Roth (US), Barbara Johnston (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France),Todd Liao (China by video), Neil Capobianco (US)

Global Mobility Panel (5:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.):
Matt Schulz (US), Michael Bronstein (UK), Todd Liao (China by video)

Restrictive Covenants Panel (6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.):
Richard Scharlat (US), Adrian Miedema (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video)

Register Now

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One week away: Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Labour-2-(ThinkStock)

December 10, 2014 04:00 PM – 07:00 PM EDT    

McGraw-Hill Conference Space    

1221 Avenue of the Americas 50th Floor

New York, NY United States

Dentons Global Employment and Labor group is pleased to invite you to an interactive program bringing together Dentons lawyers from around the globe to present on several critical employment issues facing multi-national employers. The three-panel program will be followed by networking cocktails where you will have an opportunity to mingle and connect with professionals in the industry.

Panel topics and speakers:

Moderated by Brian Cousin

Privacy Panel (4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.): Andy Roth (US), Barbara Johnston (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video), Neil Capobianco (US)

Global Mobility Panel (5:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.): Matt Schulz (US), Michael Bronstein (UK), Todd Liao (China by video)

Restrictive Covenants Panel (6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.): Richard Scharlat (US), Adrian Miedema (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video)

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Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Upcoming changes to visas between US and PRC aim to facilitate travel and decrease need for renewals

BVisa

Effective November 12, 2014, the US and the PRC will both increase the validity of business, tourist, student and exchange visitor visas issued to each other’s citizens.

Chinese business visitors and tourists may be issued multiple-entry B-1 and B-2 visas for up to 10 years. Students and exchange visitors and their accompanying family members will be eligible for F, M and J visas for multiple entry for up to 5 years or the length of their program.

US citizens going to China for short-term business and tourism will also receive multiple-entry F and L visas for up to 10 years, while American students may receive X student visa residence permits for up to 5 years, depending on the length of their program.

This change will facilitate business travel and decrease the time and cost that has been spent on more frequent visa renewals without any change in government processing fees. This change does not impact the length of authorized stay.  Visas only authorize travel to another country and the immigration officer at the port of entry/airport inspection unit will determine the length of authorized stay.

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Upcoming changes to visas between US and PRC aim to facilitate travel and decrease need for renewals