1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

A Guide to Myanmar Labour Policies

Members of Dentons global Employment and Labor team resident in the firm’s Singapore office have created a “Guide to Myanmar Labour Polices.” The guide should provide you with a quick reference tool to ensure that you are compliant with the latest laws and regulations in this area. Topics covered include:

  • Requirement of a written employment contract
  • Registration of the employment contract
  • Prescribed employment contract template
  • Terms that must be included in every employment contract
  • Social security and compensation for injury and illness
  • Engagement of independent contractors and consultants
  • Workplace safety and health provisions
  • Labor disputes
  • Trade unions and strikes
  • Employment of foreign (non-Myanmar citizens) employees
  • Draft legislation clarifying regulations on employment of foreign workers

Click here to read the full article.

, , , , ,

A Guide to Myanmar Labour Policies

Cannabis in the United States and its implications in naturalization applications

In response to requests from state and local officials for clarification and adjustment of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services policies negatively impacting the legal immigration status of individuals who work or have worked in the legal cannabis industry, USCIS has updated its Policy Manual—but has not retreated from its position that cannabis-related activities will likely bar a lawful permanent resident of the US from naturalization, even if such activities take place in a state that has legalized cannabis. For a deep dive into the updated manual—including cannabis-related activities which, while not grounds for deportation may still be grounds for inadmissibility if the LPR travels abroad and attempts to re-enter the US—please click here.

, , ,

Cannabis in the United States and its implications in naturalization applications

How US federal cannabis legalization would affect US immigration law

During the 115th US Congress, several bills were introduced to legalize marijuana at the federal level. Those receiving the most attention were: (1) the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act (STATES Act); (2) Marijuana Justice Act of 2017/Marijuana Justice Act of 2018 (Marijuana Justice Act); and (3) the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act (Marijuana Freedom Act). While all three died when the Congress ended on January 3, 2019, they are likely to be reintroduced (without change) during the 116th Congress. For our analysis of how they might affect the ability of foreign nationals to enter the United States, click here.

, ,

How US federal cannabis legalization would affect US immigration law

An overview of Canada’s Start-Up Business Class

Many foreign nationals are now aware that US immigration policies are more restrictive than in years past. For example, to protect the economic interests of US workers, President Trump issued an executive order directing government agencies to rigorously enforce and administer immigration laws. Meanwhile Canada remains relatively open to accepting new immigrants and, according to a report published by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, could accept as many as 1.1 million in total in the years 2019 through 2021. As a result, many foreign entrepreneurs who might otherwise have permanently settled in the US are instead considering Canada. Dentons partner, Henry Chang (who is based in our Toronto office) has provided a detailed discussion of Canada’s Start-Up Business Class, a permanent residence option for innovative foreign entrepreneurs. The full article appears here.

, , ,

An overview of Canada’s Start-Up Business Class

New regulations set out work and residence permit procedure for UK nationals living in Spain post-Brexit

This article was originally published on Dentons’ UK Employment Hub blog.

New regulations have been enacted in Spain setting out what UK citizens working or living in Spain after Brexit will be required to do to maintain their right to live and work there.

The regulations apply to UK and Northern Irish citizens living in Spain before the exit date. Affected individuals must apply for a special work and residence permit within 21 months of Brexit. During this 21 month “transition period”, UK nationals will broadly maintain the same rights they currently have under EU law (except, for example, the right to vote and stand in elections to the European Parliament).

Dentons’ lawyers in Spain have put together a summary of the key points of the regulations, which can be found here.

As the largest law firm in the world Dentons is uniquely placed to provide high-quality counsel to clients both within and outside Europe. Our experts have put together a number of resources, including a series of webinars and a Brexit jargon buster, which can be found here. Dentons’ lawyers in Spain have put together a summary of the key points of the regulations, which can be found here.

As the countdown to exit day continues, please contact Jessica Pattinson (Head of Immigration, UK) at jessica.pattinson@dentons.com if you require any additional support on immigration matters.

, ,

New regulations set out work and residence permit procedure for UK nationals living in Spain post-Brexit

Significant changes in the work permit regulations in Uzbekistan

The Cabinet of Ministers of the Republic of Uzbekistan on March 25 approved a new procedure for employers to obtain a license and confirm foreign nationals. Changes to the framework including a broadening of the definition of “employer,” a more streamlined process, a significant increase in fees, and limiting three-year confirmations to certain categories of persons.

Read the complete Dentons article here.

, , , ,

Significant changes in the work permit regulations in Uzbekistan

Proposed end of H-4 employment authorization likely to affect over 100,000 families

Time appears to be almost up for more than 100,000 foreign citizens working in the United States under an Obama-era special authorization for spouses of foreign workers here on the H-1B visa.

When Congress failed legislatively to address the lengthy wait times for many professionals and their families to be granted resident status, the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) in 2015, under the Obama administration, issued a regulation to allow H-4 visa spouses of qualified H-1B professionals to apply for an employment authorization document (EAD). Some members of Congress complained that the executive branch was overstepping its authority by making law—which is Congress’s job—and the regulation was the subject of much debate during the last presidential election. Now the Trump administration is seeking to make good on the President’s campaign promise to eliminate EADs for H-4 spouses.

This change especially impacts US employers of people born in India.

The reason why Indian-born professionals are impacted is because there are numerical limits on the number of green cards granted each year. To promote the diversity of new immigrants to the US, there are quota limits on the place of birth. No more than 7 percent of the total number of family-sponsored and employment-based visas available in a fiscal year may be issued to natives of any one independent country. As the demand for Indian-born professionals is far greater than the annual supply of green cards under the quota, this has created a backlog.

In 2018 for instance, the backlog of Indian-born professionals waiting their turn to get a green card was well in excess of a half million individuals. As a result, it now takes many years for an Indian-born professional to receive his or her green card. As a consequence, Indian-born professionals comprise the bulk of H-4 EAD holders.

Under the current regulation, an H-4 spouse can request an EAD if the H-1B professional is the beneficiary of either an approved employment-based immigrant visa petition, or a Department of Labor alien employment certification application or employment-based immigrant visa petition filed at least 365 days prior to the end of the sixth year of the professional’s H-1B status.

In April 2017, President Trump signed the “Buy American and Hire American” executive order, which, among other things, directed the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in coordination with other agencies, to review H-1B-related policies. The H-4 EAD regulation was one of the policies reviewed and the result was its proposed elimination.

US employers rely on H-1B professionals to make up for the shortage of qualified American professionals while keeping jobs in the US. CEOs of major US companies, sent a letter to DHS opposing the plan to eliminate the H-4 EAD. The letter pointed out that “[t]hese spouses are often highly skilled in their own rights,” and “revoking their US work authorization will likely cause high-skilled immigrants to take their skills to competitors outside the United States.

These US employers found some support in Congress. Senators Kamala D. Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand sent a letter to DHS and USCIS opposing rescission of the H-4 EAD, pointing out that the proposed change would disproportionately impact South Asian women (in 2017, 94 percent of H-4 EAD were women and 93 percent were from India).

But the administration has not changed its position. In November 2018, DHS published its mid-year regulatory agenda, which included a proposed rule to revoke the H-4 employment authorization final rule. DHS stated that “[s]ome U.S. workers would benefit from this proposed rule by having a better chance at obtaining jobs that some of the population of the H-4 workers currently hold, as the proposed rule would no longer allow H-4 workers to enter the labor market early.” With record low unemployment levels and US employers already complaining of recruiting problems, it is unclear where the DHS thinks employers will find these US workers.

The new rule, if adopted, is expected to become effective in the first half of 2019 and would impact all 100,000+ individuals currently holding an H-4 EAD. Researchers also estimate that the proposed rule will affect entire families, including the H-1B professionals themselves, because many will not be able to afford to live on one income if their dependent spouse is forced to abandon his or her career. This is especially true in areas such as Seattle and the Silicon Valley, which employ high numbers of H-1B workers and have a high cost of living. Entire families may leave the US, taking their job skills to other countries to compete with their former employers—whose only options to remain competitive may be to outsource the jobs or set up their own offshore facilities. Nearshoring to Canada has become increasingly popular, due to the relatively lower cost of doing business there and proximity to the US.

The direct cost of each failed expatriate assignment is estimated to range from $250,000 to $1 million, according to researchers. More important, the departure of these highly skilled workers represents a brain drain and a significant loss of talent for most companies.

Dentons helps employers develop strategies to recruit the world’s best and brightest to fill posts in the US and abroad. For more information, please contact the authors or your Dentons lawyer.

, , , , , , , , , ,

Proposed end of H-4 employment authorization likely to affect over 100,000 families

DHS new rule on H-1B lottery process: Who’s the winner?

 

Following President Trump’s “Buy American and Hire American” executive order issued back on April 18, 2017, a long-awaited new rule has been proposed by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that would change the existing H-1B selection process, although perhaps not before the April 2019 filing season.

Online registration

The proposed rule would require petitioners seeking to file cap-subject H-1B petitions to first electronically register with US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) during a designated registration period, which would begin at least two weeks before April 1. The registration would require information about the employer, as well as the individual H-1B beneficiary.

USCIS would then select at random from the online registration database until the limited supply available under the quota (65,000 regular cap and 20,000 US advanced degree holders) is exhausted.

The big change is that US employers would only file complete H-1B petitions for the named beneficiaries who have been selected. Government processing fees would only be paid for selected petitions.

Similar to current processing, DHS would prohibit more than one registration from the same petitioner for the same beneficiary during any given year. Further, the new rule would require petitioners to attest to their intent to file an H-1B petition for the named beneficiary in the position for which the registration is filed.

DHS believes that this will prevent US employers from submitting a large numbers of registrations but not following up with complete filings of H-1B petitions for the selected beneficiaries—something that was not possible under the existing system. The proposed rule states that USCIS would closely monitor whether selected registrations are resulting in the filing of complete H-1B petitions. If USCIS finds that petitioners are registering numerous beneficiaries but are not filing petitions “at a rate indicative of a pattern and practice of abuse of the registration system,” it would investigate and could hold the employers accountable.

Selection process

The proposed rule would reverse the order by which the H-1B cap petitions are selected. Currently, USCIS first selects 20,000 with US graduate degrees, and then allow the unselected to be considered a second time, with the rest of the world, for the 65,000 quota. The proposed rule reverses this order. The proposed rule claims that it would increase the likelihood that a US graduate degree holder would be selected by up to 16 percent, but no explanation for that calculation is provided in the rule.

Petitioners whose petitions are selected will be notified to file complete H-1B petitions for the named beneficiaries within a designated filing period, expected to be at least 60 days.

Dentons analysis

The new rule reduces USCIS’ workload, since it does not have to handle the return of unselected petitions. However, this is not likely to speed up the slow processing of H-1B petitions, since the agency generally relies on contractors to handle mailroom services, rather than the officers who adjudicate petitions.

While the new rule may reduce some paperwork for US employers, it will not likely reduce the costs, since the cost of evaluating potential H-1Bs and registering is still incurred prior to the employer signing the petition. In fact, the extra step of registration creates extra work for employers and lawyers.

The anti-fraud provision of the rule attempts to address some of the realistic problems in the H-1B problem, but at the same time creates uncertainty for US employers and would most likely result in employers that have made bona fide job offers backing out for fear of the heightened scrutiny and potential liabilities.

DHS estimates that it will spend nearly $280,000 to develop the new system and $200,000 per year to maintain it. The proposed rule does not charge employers for the registration. How long the agency will forgo charging employers for registration is hard to predict, but USCIS has very few services that it provides to employers without a fee.

It is clear that this change will detrimentally impact the ability of US employers to continue to employ foreign workers. Current law allows the continued employment of F-1 OPT/STEM OPT and J-1 workers while the H-1B is pending, until their petitions are selected and approved OR even until the government announces they are not selected or not approved. The new rule means that fewer employers will have fewer H-1B petitions pending. The situation will be even worse if the new rule speeds up adjudications, as faster adjudications means faster denials. In sum, the new rule will result in fewer US employers being able to meet their staffing needs with pending H-1B petitions.

The announcement warns that the new rule may not be implemented in time for the April 2019 H-1B filing season, since there may not be enough time to fully test the system. If the new system has not gone into effect at least two weeks prior to the filing deadline, employers should be prepared to submit full H-1B petitions for all candidates on the first business day of April 2019.

Employers and stakeholders have until January 2, 2019 to submit comments on the proposed rule.

, , , , ,

DHS new rule on H-1B lottery process: Who’s the winner?

How to count to 12: USCIS clarifies L1A visa requirements

The rules regarding qualifying employment abroad, required for an L-1 intracompany transfer visa, are clarified, if not changed, in a new US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) policy memorandum (PM).

Dated November 15, 2018, USCIS PM-602-0167, states that:

  • All visa requirements must be satisfied as of the date the agency receives the L-1 visa petition;
  • The employee must be physically outside the US for the required 1 continuous year of employment; and
  • In certain cases, time spent in the US will not break the continuity required, but that time will not be counted towards the required 1 year.

The PM does not create new law or effect a change in policy. Its stated purpose is to clarify existing rules.

The requirement that a visa petitioner meet all legal requirements at the time the petition is filed is longstanding. It already was not possible to file a defective petition and then cure that defect with facts that occur subsequent to filing. That is why L-1 petitions could never be filed before an employee completed the full 12 months of employment abroad.

The PM repeats the agency’s regulation that brief trips to the US for business or pleasure do not interrupt the required 1 continuous year of employment abroad. The regulations never defined “brief” and the PM, regrettably, doesn’t either. There is an example in the memo of brief trips totaling 60 days during the 1 year. It would have been better if the PM stated whether, for example, 1 trip for 60 days is brief, or 2 trips for 30 days, etc. As a result, the situation is neither improved nor worsened by the PM’s issuance.

Even though the law already clearly states that only days when the employee is physically outside the US may be counted, the PM states that time spent in the US working for a qualifying organization does not count, and updates Chapter 32.3 of the Adjudicator’s Field Manual to reflect this needless clarification.

For the full text of the Policy Memo, can be found at the USCIS website.

Please contact the authors for more information about this PM, the L-1 intracompany transfer visa or other business visas for the US or any other of the many countries where Dentons guides clients on business and cross-border mobility matters.

, , , ,

How to count to 12: USCIS clarifies L1A visa requirements

US State Department’s October 2018 Visa Bulletin shows whose turn it is to immigrate

Applicants waiting to file for an adjustment of status to become a lawful permanent resident may use the “Dates for Filing Applications” chart in the October 2018 Visa Bulletin to determine whether it is their turn to apply to US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Each month, the US Department of State (DOS) publishes the Visa Bulletin, which shows immigrant visa availability for applicants waiting to file for permanent residence, either through a US consular post abroad or USCIS here in the US. There are two charts in the Visa Bulletin: “Application Final Action Dates” and “Dates for Filing Applications.” The former indicates dates when a final visa may be issued and a green card granted; the latter indicates the earliest dates when applicants may be able to apply.

Generally, the Dates for Filing Applications chart has cutoff dates later than those in the Application Final Action Dates chart. This allows applicants to apply earlier and gives the government time to process the applications.

After the DOS announced the dual chart system in 2015, USCIS announced how it uses the charts.  Under the current procedure, approximately one week after the DOS publishes its monthly Visa Bulletin, USCIS announces on its website which chart is to be used for the upcoming month. Applicants must follow USCIS’ announcement in determining when to apply.

Usually, USCIS uses the Application Final Action Dates chart which delayed filings, with the exception of only five times since 2015 when it indicated that the other chart may be used. It is therefore welcome news that USCIS has announced that the following Dates for Filing Applications chart may once again be used in October 2018. What this means is that employment-based applicants with a priority date earlier than the one indicated in the below chart, may now file their applications this month.

Dates for filing for employment-based adjustment of status applications
Employment-based ALL CHARGEABILITY AREAS (except those listed) CHINA (mainland born) EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA and HONDURAS INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES
1st June 1, 2018 October 1, 2017 June 1, 2018 October 1, 2017 June 1, 2018 June 1, 2018
2nd C June 15, 2015 C May 22, 2009 C C
3rd C August 8, 2015 C October 1, 2009 C July 1, 2017
Other Workers C June 1, 2008 C October 1, 2009 C July 1, 2017
4th C C May 1, 2016 C C C
Certain religious workers C C May 1, 2016 C C C
5th
Non-regional center
(C5 and T5)
C October 1, 2014 C C C C
5th
Regional center
(I5 and R5)
C October 1, 2014 C C C C
US State Department’s October 2018 Visa Bulletin shows whose turn it is to immigrate