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US green card availability to increase beginning October 1

visa-perm

Effective October 1, 2016, green cards will become more readily available for most people immigrating to the United States on employment-based (EB) immigrant visa categories.

The US State Department announced in the October 2016 edition of its Visa Bulletin that the agency is processing requests under the EB1 category for all countries of birth, effective October 1. This category includes aliens of extraordinary ability, outstanding professors and researchers, and multinational managers and executives, regardless of place of birth. During the summer, the agency reported a lengthy backlog for EB1 immigrants born in mainland China and India.

The EB2 category—for professionals with an advanced degree and aliens of exceptional ability—is also immediately available, except for individuals born in mainland China and India, for whom the category is backlogged to February 15, 2012, and January 15, 2007, respectively.

The EB3 category—for professionals and skilled workers—has limited available for all places of birth. That said, the backlog for most places is to June 1, 2016, and it is not likely to slow the process of immigration, since the Department of Labor generally takes more than four months to grant the alien employment certification application, often referred to as PERM, longer and that is a prerequisite for EB3 immigration.

The EB5 category—for investors—is currently available for all places of birth except mainland China, which continues to be where the majority of EB5 immigrants are born. EB5 is unavailable for China-born investors in projects in Regional Centers, while EB5 is available to China-born investors in non-Regional Center projects who have I-526 immigrant petition receipt dates on or before February 22, 2014.

There is an annual limited supply of immigrant visas in all EB categories that is replenished effective October 1, the first day of the new fiscal year. In categories where the annual demand tends to be greater than the limited supply, the Visa Bulletins issued for October through April often show the most movement. There is often more movement in the dates for individuals born in mainland China and India during these months. The EB1 and EB5 dates that have improved so much since the September 2016 Visa Bulletin are likely to retrogress once again later in the fiscal year, but the State Department did not release a prediction as to when or by how much.

The full text of the October 2016 Visa Bulletin can be found here.

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US green card availability to increase beginning October 1

US Visa Bulletin Update—EB-1 backlogs predicted

india-china

Effective August 1, 2016, the employment-based, first-preference immigrant visa (EB-1) is no longer expected to be immediately available for individuals born in India and China. Availability is predicted by the State Department to retrogress to January 1, 2010, and to not become current again until the new fiscal year begins on October 1, 2016. EB-1 will remain current and immediately available to individuals born in all other countries.

EB-1 includes:

  • EB-1A – Individuals of extraordinary ability
  • EB-1B – Outstanding professors and researchers
  • EB-1C – Multinational executives and managers

EB-1 was created as part of the Immigration Act of 1990. This important visa category has, since its creation, generally been immediately available and without any quota backlog. Employment-based immigration in other visa categories has long been slower for immigrants born in India and China due to the large number of applications filed each year.

Although the backlog is not expected to hit until the last two months of the current fiscal year, it is reasonable to assume that, with the anticipated continued growth of immigration to the US from India and China, it will only worsen in fiscal year 2017. While it is difficult to predict how quickly the wait list will grow, to avoid what may become very lengthy processing delays, your best strategy for securing an early priority date is to file your EB-1 immigrant visa petition as soon as possible.

The EB-2 (for professionals with advanced degrees) and EB-3 (for professionals and skilled workers) visa categories already retrogressed in June for individuals born in China and no forward movement is likely for the rest of the fiscal year, but then resume movement forward in October 2016 – no specific date identified, but I estimate it will be current for at least the first six months of fiscal year 2017 (i.e., until April 2017).

EB-2 worldwide is expected to have a cut-off date in the September Visa Bulletin, but the State Department has not yet predicted a specific date.

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US Visa Bulletin Update—EB-1 backlogs predicted

H-1B blast off countdown 2016

T minus 72 days. The countdown has begun.  The date is coming.  It will be here soon.

It is the biggest event of the year in United States immigration.

Hundreds of thousands will apply, but only a lucky few will be chosen.  Employers keen to recruit and employ the best and brightest talent from around the globe to meet American business needs are already gearing up.  Professionals eager to pursue their career in the United States are updating resumes and collecting diplomas and reference letters.  This program is not the best way for a country to succeed, but the United States Congress continues to lack the will and wisdom to change a law almost 25 years old.

Are you ready?

April 1, 2016, is the first day that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services agency (USCIS) will accept new H-1B specialty occupation worker nonimmigrant visa petitions by employers for foreign professionals.  It is important for global mobility and human resource managers to start work now to secure preliminary Department of Labor approvals, foreign degree evaluations, etc., to be ready to file the petition for an April 1 receipt date.

Limited supply

Only a limited number of new H-1B visas are accepted each year due to legal quota restrictions.  Every year, 65,000 new H-1B visa petitions can be granted, of which 6,800 are set aside for citizens of Chile and Singapore under Free Trade Agreements with those countries. To the extent there were unused Free Trade Agreement H-1Bs, those are added to the quota for the next fiscal year.  There is an additional allocation of 20,000 new H-1B visa petitions that can be accepted if the foreign professional earned a graduate degree from a university in the United States.

Not all H-1B visa petitions are subject to numerical limits. Individuals already holding H-1B visas are counted against the quota, and petitions filed by institutions of higher education or related or affiliated nonprofit entities, nonprofit research organizations or governmental research organizations are exempt from the limits. The exemption for petitions filed for jobs only in Guam or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands expired on December 31, 2015.

Overwhelming demand

Last year, the USCIS received so many new H-1B visa petitions in the first week of April that the agency ended the application window on April 7.  Approximately 233,000 new petitions were received, as compared to 172,500 in the prior year.  As the regulations mandate, officers then selected—at random—which envelopes to open and returned the rest unopened with the government filing fees.  Only then did the agency begin the often long process to approve or deny the selected petitions on the merits of eligibility.

This year, the USCIS will once again receive more than they are allowed to accept.  Again, the agency will randomly decide the envelopes to open and those to return unopened.  The likelihood of a petition being selected in April 2016 is likely to be much, much lower than last year, taking into consideration the current state of the economy, the relatively low rate of American unemployment in typical H-1B specialty occupations, and the labor needs of United States employers.

The countdown begins now (download dates directly into your Outlook)

launch

T minus 72 days (January 19):  Start working with legal counsel now.  Identify current and prospective employees who will need new H-1B visa petitions.

T minus 45 days (February 15):  By now, you and legal counsel should have requested the labor condition application certification from the Department of Labor.  Employers new to the process or who have not filed recently will need to create the appropriate accounts with the Department of Labor. Because the USCIS relies on Dunn & Bradstreet data (DUNS) as part of its employer background verification process, it is important for employers to create or update the company’s DUNS records to avoid inconsistencies with H-1B visa petition filings.

T minus 30 days (March 1):  Have all the required USCIS forms and supporting documents been signed and filing fee checks prepared?  There is still some time left to get last minute details completed, but this is when it gets very hectic.  Government systems often become overloaded and delays at the Department of Labor for late filings are common.

T minus 1 day (March 31):  Envelopes should be properly addressed and delivered to the express service of choice with next business morning delivery instructions.

T minus 0 (April 1):  Just like at NASA ground control, this is the stage in the process where all the hard work resulted in successful delivery of the visa petition and you have to wait for the USCIS to announce whether the petition is selected or returned—usually within 3 weeks or so.

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H-1B blast off countdown 2016

Global Mobility Guide

 

Global Mobility Guide

We are so pleased to bring you the Dentons Global Mobility Guide 2015.

The ability to move skilled workers globally is essential to the success of the world economy and the companies that drive it.

“Global mobility” minimizes the risks for doing business internationally by providing the legal framework to identify and analyze business problems, and develop and implement creative solutions. Getting it right means getting people to the right place at the right time with the right advice.

The laws impacting global mobility are dynamic. Multinational employers need to know the existing laws and the evolving legal trends to compete in an international market where business transcends borders. Dentons professionals can provide that.

Our Global Mobility practice helps multinational employers navigate the local laws of the countries where they do business, with lawyers speaking the local language in more than 75 locations around the world, well-versed in all of the intertwined issues: immigration, employment, compensation, employee benefits, taxation and social insurance.

Dentons’ network of offices and qualified staff around the world provides you with experienced legal resources—wherever and whenever you need us.

Read the complete report

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Global Mobility Guide

H-1B Blast Off Countdown

T minus 84 days. The countdown has begun.  The date is coming.  It will be here soon.

It is the biggest event of the year in United States immigration.

Hundreds of thousands will apply, but only a lucky few will be chosen.  Employers keen to recruit and employ the best and brightest talent from around the globe to meet American business needs are already gearing up.  Professionals eager to pursue their career in the United States are updating resumes and collecting diplomas and reference letters.  This program is not the best way for a country to succeed, but the United States Congress continues to lack the will and wisdom to change a law almost 25 years old.

Are you ready?

April 1, 2015, is the first day that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services agency (USCIS) will accept new H-1B specialty occupation worker nonimmigrant visa petitions by employers for foreign professionals.  It is important for global mobility and human resource managers to start work now to secure preliminary Department of Labor approvals, foreign degree evaluations, etc., to be ready to file the petition for an April 1 receipt date.

Limited Supply

Only a limited number of new H-1B visas are accepted each year due to legal quota restrictions.  Every year, 65,000 new H-1B visa petitions can be granted, of which 6,800 are set aside for citizens of Chile and Singapore under Free Trade Agreements with those countries. To the extent there were unused Free Trade Agreement H-1Bs, those are added to the quota for the next fiscal year.  There is an additional allocation of 20,000 new H-1B visa petitions that can be accepted if the foreign professional earned a graduate degree from a university in the United States.

Not all H-1B visa petitions are subject to numerical limits. Individuals already holding H-1B visas are counted again the quota, and petitions filed by institutions of higher education or related or affiliated nonprofit entities, nonprofit research organizations or governmental research organizations are exempt from the limits.  In addition, petitions filed for jobs only in Guam or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands are exempt from the cap until December 31, 2015.

Overwhelming Demand

Last year, the USCIS received so many new H-1B visa petitions in the first week of April that the agency ended the application window on April 5.  Approximately 172,500 new petitions were received, as compared to 124,000 in the prior year.  As the regulations mandate, officers then selected — at random — which envelopes to open and returned the rest unopened with the government filing fees.  Only then did the agency begin the often long process to approve or deny the selected petitions on the merits of eligibility.

This year, the USCIS will once again receive more than they are allowed to accept.  Again, the agency will randomly decide the envelopes to open and those to return unopened.  The likelihood of a petition being selected in April 2015 is likely to be much, much lower than last year, taking into consideration the current state of the economy, the relatively low rate of American unemployment in typical H-1B specialty occupations, and the labor needs of United States employers.

The Countdown Begins Now (download dates directly into your Outlook) 

launch

T minus 84 days (January 7):  Start working with legal counsel now.  Identify current and prospective employees who will need new H-1B visa petitions.

T minus 60 days (February 1):  You and your legal counsel should be working together to prepare job descriptions, determine prevailing wage rates, secure equivalency evaluations of foreign degrees and work experience, and translate key documents.

T minus 45 days (February 15):  By now, you and legal counsel should have requested the labor condition application certification from the Department of Labor.  Employers new to the process or who have not filed recently will need to create the appropriate accounts with the Department of Labor. Because the USCIS relies on Dunn & Bradstreet data (DUNS) as part of its employer background verification process, it is important for employers to create or update the company’s DUNS records to avoid inconsistencies with H-1B visa petition filings.

T minus 30 days (March 1):  Have all the required USCIS forms and supporting documents been signed and filing fee checks prepared?  There is still some time left to get last minute details completed, but this is when it gets very hectic.  Government systems often become overloaded and delays at the Department of Labor for late filings are common.

T minus 1 day (March 31):  Envelopes should be properly addressed and delivered to the express service of choice with next business morning delivery instructions.

T minus 0 (April 1):  Just like at NASA ground control, this is the stage in the process where all the hard work resulted in successful delivery of the visa petition and you have to wait for the USCIS to announce whether the petition is selected or returned — usually within 3 weeks or so.

liftoff

 

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H-1B Blast Off Countdown

Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

trade-customs1

Last week Dentons held its program on employment issues facing multi-national companies. For your convenience, the program can be viewed in it’s entirety by visiting the event page.

Dentons event

If you are interested in receiving additional information on Dentons’ Employment practice and/or have topic suggestions for future seminars, please contact Jennifer Gonzales-Frisbie, Business Development Manager, at jennifer.gonzales‑frisbie@dentons.com.

We hope to see you at our next program.

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Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

One week away: Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Labour-2-(ThinkStock)

With one week left, click here to register for our CLE program on Critical Employment Issues Facing Multi-National Employers.

December 10, 2014
04:00 PM – 07:00 PM EDT
1221 Avenue of the Americas
50th Floor
New York, NY
United States

Dentons Global Employment and Labor group is pleased to invite you to an interactive program bringing together Dentons lawyers from around the globe to present on several critical employment issues facing multi-national employers. The three-panel program will be followed by networking cocktails where you will have an opportunity to mingle and connect with professionals in the industry.

Panel topics and speakers:

Moderated by Brian Cousin

Privacy Panel (4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.):
Andy Roth (US), Barbara Johnston (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France),Todd Liao (China by video), Neil Capobianco (US)

Global Mobility Panel (5:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.):
Matt Schulz (US), Michael Bronstein (UK), Todd Liao (China by video)

Restrictive Covenants Panel (6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.):
Richard Scharlat (US), Adrian Miedema (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video)

Register Now

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One week away: Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

US executive action promises important new immigration benefits for some

 

President Obama Speaks On Homeland Security's Announcement About Deportations

US President Obama announced on November 20, 2014 a series of executive actions to crack down on illegal immigration at the border, prioritize deporting felons not families, and require certain undocumented immigrants to pass a criminal background check and pay taxes in order to temporarily stay in the US without fear of deportation.  The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services agency (USCIS) announced that it is not yet accepting any applications for benefits under this program, stating that “[s]ome initiatives will be implemented over the next several months and some will take longer.”

Among the President’s initiatives is a plan to modernize, improve and clarify immigrant and nonimmigrant programs to grow our economy and create jobs.  This is intended to primarily benefit US businesses, foreign investors, researchers, inventors and skilled foreign workers.

The USCIS states that it will implement this initiative as follows:

  • Work with the Department of State to develop a method to allocate immigrant visas to ensure that all immigrant visas authorized by Congress are issued to eligible individuals when there is sufficient demand for such visas.
  • Work with the Department of State to modify the Visa Bulletin system to more simply and reliably make determinations of visa availability.
  • Provide clarity on adjustment portability to remove unnecessary restrictions on natural career progression and general job mobility to provide relief to workers facing lengthy adjustment delays.
  • Clarify the standard by which a national interest waiver may be granted to foreign inventors, researchers and founders of start-up enterprises to benefit the US economy.
  • Authorize parole, on a case-by-case basis, to eligible inventors, researchers and founders of start-up enterprises who may not yet qualify for a national interest waiver, but who:
    • Have been awarded substantial US investor financing; or
    • Otherwise hold the promise of innovation and job creation through the development of new technologies or the pursuit of cutting-edge research.
    • Finalize a rule to provide work authorization to the spouses of certain H-1B visa holders who are on the path to lawful permanent resident status.
    • Work with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to develop regulations for notice and comment to expand and extend the use of optional practical training (OPT) for foreign students, consistent with existing law.
    • Provide clear, consolidated guidance on the meaning of “specialized knowledge” to bring greater clarity and integrity to the L-1B program, improve consistency in adjudications, and enhance companies’ confidence in the program.

There is an additional, well publicized initiative to provide temporary legal status to certain individuals who have been in the US unlawfully for a continuous period of more than 5 years, if they are the parent of a US citizen or lawful permanent resident.  More details on all of the initiatives can be found at the USCIS web site.

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US executive action promises important new immigration benefits for some

Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Labour-2-(ThinkStock)

December 10, 2014 04:00 PM – 07:00 PM EDT    

McGraw-Hill Conference Space    

1221 Avenue of the Americas 50th Floor

New York, NY United States

Dentons Global Employment and Labor group is pleased to invite you to an interactive program bringing together Dentons lawyers from around the globe to present on several critical employment issues facing multi-national employers. The three-panel program will be followed by networking cocktails where you will have an opportunity to mingle and connect with professionals in the industry.

Panel topics and speakers:

Moderated by Brian Cousin

Privacy Panel (4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.): Andy Roth (US), Barbara Johnston (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video), Neil Capobianco (US)

Global Mobility Panel (5:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.): Matt Schulz (US), Michael Bronstein (UK), Todd Liao (China by video)

Restrictive Covenants Panel (6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.): Richard Scharlat (US), Adrian Miedema (Canada), Michael Bronstein (UK), Katell Deniel-Allioux (France), Todd Liao (China by video)

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Critical employment issues facing multi-national employers

Upcoming changes to visas between US and PRC aim to facilitate travel and decrease need for renewals

BVisa

Effective November 12, 2014, the US and the PRC will both increase the validity of business, tourist, student and exchange visitor visas issued to each other’s citizens.

Chinese business visitors and tourists may be issued multiple-entry B-1 and B-2 visas for up to 10 years. Students and exchange visitors and their accompanying family members will be eligible for F, M and J visas for multiple entry for up to 5 years or the length of their program.

US citizens going to China for short-term business and tourism will also receive multiple-entry F and L visas for up to 10 years, while American students may receive X student visa residence permits for up to 5 years, depending on the length of their program.

This change will facilitate business travel and decrease the time and cost that has been spent on more frequent visa renewals without any change in government processing fees. This change does not impact the length of authorized stay.  Visas only authorize travel to another country and the immigration officer at the port of entry/airport inspection unit will determine the length of authorized stay.

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Upcoming changes to visas between US and PRC aim to facilitate travel and decrease need for renewals